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Article

Long-Term Home-Monitoring Sensor Technology in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease—Acceptance and Adherence

1
Gerontechnology and Rehabilitation Group, University of Bern, 3008 Bern, Switzerland
2
ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, 3008 Bern, Switzerland
3
iHomeLab, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts—Engineering and Architecture, 6048 Horw, Switzerland
4
Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory, Departments of Neurology and BioMedical Research, Inselspital, University Hospital Bern and University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland
5
Neurology and Neurorehabilitation Center, Luzerner Kantonsspital, 6000 Luzern, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5169; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235169
Received: 30 September 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 22 November 2019 / Published: 26 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IoT Sensors in E-Health)
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by a highly individual disease-profile as well as fluctuating symptoms. Consequently, 24-h home monitoring in a real-world environment would be an ideal solution for precise symptom diagnostics. In recent years, small lightweight sensors which have assisted in objective, reliable analysis of motor symptoms have attracted a lot of attention. While technical advances are important, patient acceptance of such new systems is just as crucial to increase long-term adherence. So far, there has been a lack of long-term evaluations of PD-patient sensor adherence and acceptance. In a pilot study of PD patients (N = 4), adherence (wearing time) and acceptance (questionnaires) of a multi-part sensor set was evaluated over a 4-week timespan. The evaluated sensor set consisted of 3 body-worn sensors and 7 at-home installed ambient sensors. After one month of continuous monitoring, the overall system usability scale (SUS)-questionnaire score was 71.5%, with an average acceptance score of 87% for the body-worn sensors and 100% for the ambient sensors. On average, sensors were worn 15 h and 4 min per day. All patients reported strong preferences of the sensor set over manual self-reporting methods. Our results coincide with measured high adherence and acceptance rate of similar short-term studies and extend them to long-term monitoring. View Full-Text
Keywords: Parkinson’s disease; body-worn sensors; ambient sensors; Accelerometer; PIR sensor; acceptance; adherence; patient monitoring; telemetry; remote sensing technology; wearable electronic devices; symptom assessment; motor disorders Parkinson’s disease; body-worn sensors; ambient sensors; Accelerometer; PIR sensor; acceptance; adherence; patient monitoring; telemetry; remote sensing technology; wearable electronic devices; symptom assessment; motor disorders
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MDPI and ACS Style

Botros, A.; Schütz, N.; Camenzind, M.; Urwyler, P.; Bolliger, D.; Vanbellingen, T.; Kistler, R.; Bohlhalter, S.; Müri, R.M.; Mosimann, U.P.; Nef, T. Long-Term Home-Monitoring Sensor Technology in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease—Acceptance and Adherence. Sensors 2019, 19, 5169. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235169

AMA Style

Botros A, Schütz N, Camenzind M, Urwyler P, Bolliger D, Vanbellingen T, Kistler R, Bohlhalter S, Müri RM, Mosimann UP, Nef T. Long-Term Home-Monitoring Sensor Technology in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease—Acceptance and Adherence. Sensors. 2019; 19(23):5169. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235169

Chicago/Turabian Style

Botros, Angela, Narayan Schütz, Martin Camenzind, Prabitha Urwyler, Daniel Bolliger, Tim Vanbellingen, Rolf Kistler, Stephan Bohlhalter, Rene M. Müri, Urs P. Mosimann, and Tobias Nef. 2019. "Long-Term Home-Monitoring Sensor Technology in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease—Acceptance and Adherence" Sensors 19, no. 23: 5169. https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235169

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