Next Article in Journal
Undara Lava Cave Fauna in Tropical Queensland with an Annotated List of Australian Subterranean Biodiversity Hotspots
Previous Article in Journal
Genetic Structure and Diversity of the Yellowbelly Threadfin Bream Nemipterus bathybius in the Northern South China Sea
Previous Article in Special Issue
First Insights into the Microbiology of Three Antarctic Briny Systems of the Northern Victoria Land
Article

What Makes a Hot-Spring Habitat “Hot” for the Hot-Spring Snake: Distributional Data and Niche Modelling for the Genus Thermophis (Serpentes, Colubridae)

1
Centre of Taxonomy and Evolutionary Research, Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig, Adenauerallee 160, 53113 Bonn, Germany
2
Institute of Zoology, Martin-Luther University, Domplatz 4, 06108 Halle, Germany
3
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Tibet University, Lhasa 850000, China
4
Department of Geography, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Deutschhausstrasse 12, 35032 Marburg, Germany
5
Statistical Genetics and Bioinformatics, Cologne Center for Genomics, University of Cologne, Weyertal 115b, 50931 Cologne, Germany
6
Faculty of Medicine, The Cologne University Hospital, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luca Luiselli
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070325
Received: 5 July 2021 / Revised: 14 July 2021 / Accepted: 14 July 2021 / Published: 16 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2021 Feature Papers by Diversity’s Editorial Board Members)
Knowledge about species’ distributions is central to diverse applications in ecology, biogeography, and conservation science. Hot-spring snakes of the genus Thermophis share a distribution restricted to geothermal sites at the Tibetan Plateau (T. baileyi) and in the Hengduan Mountains (T. zhaoermii, T. shangrila). Although the suture zones of these regions are widely covered with hot springs, Thermophis populations are restricted to only a few of these habitats. Here, we use bioclimatic, topographic, and land cover data to model the potential distribution of the genus. Moreover, using logistic regression on field survey data of T. zhaoermii, we test whether hot-spring water parameters and landscape features correlate with the species’ presence or absence. Hot springs with temperatures between 45 and 100 °C and winter precipitation showed the most predictive power. At small scale, our data support the relevance of the hot-spring temperature on the species’ occurrence and indicate that also the along-valley distance from the hot-spring site to the major river might influence the distribution of Thermophis species. Our findings contribute to better understand factors shaping the current distribution of the genus and will aid in setting priorities in applied conservation biology for the hot-spring snakes. View Full-Text
Keywords: hot-spring keel-back; distribution; habitat suitability; Hengduan Mountains; Qinghai-Tibet-Plateau hot-spring keel-back; distribution; habitat suitability; Hengduan Mountains; Qinghai-Tibet-Plateau
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hofmann, S.; Fritzsche, P.; Dorge, T.; Miehe, G.; Nothnagel, M. What Makes a Hot-Spring Habitat “Hot” for the Hot-Spring Snake: Distributional Data and Niche Modelling for the Genus Thermophis (Serpentes, Colubridae). Diversity 2021, 13, 325. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070325

AMA Style

Hofmann S, Fritzsche P, Dorge T, Miehe G, Nothnagel M. What Makes a Hot-Spring Habitat “Hot” for the Hot-Spring Snake: Distributional Data and Niche Modelling for the Genus Thermophis (Serpentes, Colubridae). Diversity. 2021; 13(7):325. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070325

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hofmann, Sylvia, Peter Fritzsche, Tsering Dorge, Georg Miehe, and Michael Nothnagel. 2021. "What Makes a Hot-Spring Habitat “Hot” for the Hot-Spring Snake: Distributional Data and Niche Modelling for the Genus Thermophis (Serpentes, Colubridae)" Diversity 13, no. 7: 325. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070325

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop