Next Article in Journal
A National Survey of Managed Honey Bee Colony Winter Losses (Apis mellifera) in China (2013–2017)
Next Article in Special Issue
Inferring Species Interactions from Long-Term Monitoring Programs: Carnivores in a Protected Area from Southern Patagonia
Previous Article in Journal
Crenal Habitats: Sources of Water Mite (Acari: Hydrachnidia) Diversity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Spatial Segregation between Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes), European Wildcats (Felis silvestris) and Domestic Cats (Felis catus) in Pastures in a Livestock Area of Northern Spain
Article

Exotic Prey Facilitate Coexistence between Pumas and Culpeo Foxes in the Andes of Central Chile

1
Wildlife Habitat and Population Analysis Lab, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
2
Department of Ecology, Proyecto Carnívoros Australes, Constitución 3560000, Región del Maule, Chile
3
Fauna Australis Wildlife Laboratory, Department of Ecosystems and The Environment, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 7820244, Chile
4
School of Veterinary Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 7820244, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090317
Received: 19 July 2020 / Revised: 15 August 2020 / Accepted: 18 August 2020 / Published: 20 August 2020
Coexistence between species with similar ecological niches implies species must segregate along one or more niche axes to survive. Space, time, and trophic resources are regarded as the principal axes upon which species segregate. We examined segregation along these niche axes to determine mechanisms underlying coexistence between the two main predators, puma (Puma concolor) and culpeo foxes (Lycalopex culpaeus) in the Andes of Central Chile. We used occupancy modeling to examine space use and overlap, Kernel Density Estimation to determine temporal activity patterns and overlap, and analysis of prey remains in feces to assess diet breadth and similarity. We found high spatial overlap and positive associations between detection of the carnivores lending little support for spatial segregation. Similarly, we found high nocturnal, temporal overlap between pumas and foxes that matched peaks in activity of prey. In contrast, we found relatively low dietary overlap indicating niche segregation likely occurs along the dietary axis. The Puma diet was dominated by introduced, exotic hares and foxes appeared to shift away from hares to rabbits, small mammals, and seeds. Given that lagomorphs are the main dietary resource for pumas in particular, management decisions regarding the control or eradication of such exotic species could negatively affected puma survival. View Full-Text
Keywords: activity patterns; Andes; camera trapping; carnivores; coexistence; exotic prey; fox; mountain lion; predators; puma activity patterns; Andes; camera trapping; carnivores; coexistence; exotic prey; fox; mountain lion; predators; puma
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Osorio, C.; Muñoz, A.; Guarda, N.; Bonacic, C.; Kelly, M. Exotic Prey Facilitate Coexistence between Pumas and Culpeo Foxes in the Andes of Central Chile. Diversity 2020, 12, 317. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090317

AMA Style

Osorio C, Muñoz A, Guarda N, Bonacic C, Kelly M. Exotic Prey Facilitate Coexistence between Pumas and Culpeo Foxes in the Andes of Central Chile. Diversity. 2020; 12(9):317. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090317

Chicago/Turabian Style

Osorio, Christian, Ana Muñoz, Nicolás Guarda, Cristian Bonacic, and Marcella Kelly. 2020. "Exotic Prey Facilitate Coexistence between Pumas and Culpeo Foxes in the Andes of Central Chile" Diversity 12, no. 9: 317. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090317

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop