Next Article in Journal
Hotspots of Subterranean Biodiversity
Next Article in Special Issue
River Capture and Freshwater Biological Evolution: A Review of Galaxiid Fish Vicariance
Previous Article in Journal
Differences in the Olfactory Sensitivity of Ceratitis capitata to Headspace of Some Host Plants in Relation to Sex, Mating Condition and Population
Previous Article in Special Issue
Morphological Convergence and Divergence in Galaxias Fishes in Lentic and Lotic Habitats
Open AccessReview

A Review of Galaxias (Galaxiidae) Fossils from the Southern Hemisphere

1
Department of Animal Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Göttingen, 37073 Göttingen, Germany
2
Department of Geology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
3
Department of Zoology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
4
Natural History Museum of Denmark, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(5), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12050208
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 20 May 2020 / Accepted: 21 May 2020 / Published: 25 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evolutionary Genetics and Biogeography of Galaxiid Fishes)
The Galaxiidae is a Southern Hemisphere family of freshwater fish, considered to be of Gondwanan origin based on the current distribution of species in New Zealand, Australia (including Tasmania), New Caledonia, Africa, South America, and on some associated and subantarctic islands. The fossil record of galaxiids is extremely sparse and geographically restricted. The only galaxiid fossils currently known come from several Miocene lakes in southern New Zealand. They include more than 100 articulated fishes, some remarkably preserving soft parts such as eyes and skin, skulls and jaw components, and more than 200 isolated otoliths. Common coprolites and in situ preserved gut content at one site (Foulden Maar) indicate the different diets of larvae and adult fish. These discoveries reveal a diverse Galaxias fauna, the presence of lake-locked populations, ontogenetic diet shifts, and representatives of several non-migratory Galaxias lineages associated with inland streams and lakes. There are at least six Galaxias species based on macrofossils and six separate otolith-based species from varied volcanic and regional lacustrine environments. This diversity points to southern New Zealand as a centre of biodiversity and speciation in Galaxiidae in the early to late Miocene. View Full-Text
Keywords: Miocene; articulated skeletons; otoliths; coprolites; taphonomy; paleoecology; biogeography; New Zealand; fossil Konservat-Lagerstätte Miocene; articulated skeletons; otoliths; coprolites; taphonomy; paleoecology; biogeography; New Zealand; fossil Konservat-Lagerstätte
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Kaulfuss, U.; Lee, D.E.; Robinson, J.H.; Wallis, G.P.; Schwarzhans, W.W. A Review of Galaxias (Galaxiidae) Fossils from the Southern Hemisphere. Diversity 2020, 12, 208. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12050208

AMA Style

Kaulfuss U, Lee DE, Robinson JH, Wallis GP, Schwarzhans WW. A Review of Galaxias (Galaxiidae) Fossils from the Southern Hemisphere. Diversity. 2020; 12(5):208. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12050208

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaulfuss, Uwe; Lee, Daphne E.; Robinson, Jeffrey H.; Wallis, Graham P.; Schwarzhans, Werner W. 2020. "A Review of Galaxias (Galaxiidae) Fossils from the Southern Hemisphere" Diversity 12, no. 5: 208. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12050208

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop