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Diversity and Conservation through Cultivation of Hypoxis in Africa—A Case Study of Hypoxis hemerocallidea

1
Green Biotechnologies Research Centre of Excellence, University of Limpopo, Private Bag X1106, Sovenga 0722, South Africa
2
Agricultural Research Council, Vegetable and Ornamental Plant Private Bag X293, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(4), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12040122
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Vegetation and Flora in Tropical Africa)
Africa has the largest diversity of the genus Hypoxis, accounting for 61% of the current globally accepted taxa within the genus, including some endemic species. Using Hypoxis hemerocallidea as a case study, this review addresses the conservation concerns arising from the unsustainable, wild harvesting of a number of Hypoxis species. Hypoxis hemerocallidea is one of the wild-harvested, economically important, indigenous medicinal plants of southern Africa, with potential in natural product and drug development. There are several products made from the species, including capsules, tinctures, tonics and creams that are available in the market. The use of H. hemerocallidea as a “cure-all” medicine puts an important harvesting pressure on the species. Unsustainable harvesting causes a continuing decline of its populations and it is therefore of high priority for conservation, including a strong case to cultivate the species. Reviewing the current knowledge and gaps on cultivation of H. hemerocallidea, we suggest the creation of a platform for linking all the stakeholders in the industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: African potato; conservation; commercialization; cultivation; Hypoxidaceae; medicinal plant; unsustainable harvesting; wild harvesting African potato; conservation; commercialization; cultivation; Hypoxidaceae; medicinal plant; unsustainable harvesting; wild harvesting
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Mofokeng, M.M.; Araya, H.T.; Amoo, S.O.; Sehlola, D.; du Plooy, C.P.; Bairu, M.W.; Venter, S.; Mashela, P.W. Diversity and Conservation through Cultivation of Hypoxis in Africa—A Case Study of Hypoxis hemerocallidea. Diversity 2020, 12, 122.

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