Next Article in Journal
A Special Issue on Microorganisms from Extreme Environments in Memory of Luigi Michaud (1974–2014)
Next Article in Special Issue
Vespa velutina: An Alien Driver of Honey Bee Colony Losses
Previous Article in Journal
Conservation Status and Challenges of the Atlantic Forest Birds of Paraguay
Previous Article in Special Issue
Diagnosis of Varroa Mite (Varroa destructor) and Sustainable Control in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Colonies—A Review
Open AccessArticle

Population Growth and Insecticide Residues of Honey Bees in Tropical Agricultural Landscapes

1
Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB University), Bogor 16680, Indonesia
2
Center for Transdisciplinary and Sustainability Sciences, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB University), Bogor 16129, Indonesia
3
Department of Plant Pests and Diseases, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Brawijaya, Malang 65145, Indonesia
4
Department of Biology, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB University), Bogor 16680, Indonesia
5
PT. Syngenta Indonesia, Jakarta 12560, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12010001
Received: 14 November 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 16 December 2019 / Published: 18 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring of Honey Bee Colony Losses)
Global decline of pollinators, especially bees, has been documented in many countries. Several causes such as land-use change and agricultural intensification are reported to be the main drivers of the decline. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of land use on honey bee and stingless bee populations. Research was conducted in Bogor and Malang to compare between two different geographical areas. Managed bees such as honey bees (Apis cerana and A. mellifera) and stingless bees (Tetragonula laeviceps) were investigated to examine the effect of agricultural intensification. Field experiments were conducted by placing beehives in selected habitats (i.e., beekeeper gardens, forests areas, and agriculture areas). Population growth and neonicotinoid residue analysis of bees in different hive locations were measured to study the effect of habitat type. Population growth of bees represents the forager abundance and colony weight. Based on the analysis, we found that habitat type affected forager abundance and colony weight of honey bees (p < 0.05), although the patterns were different between species, region, as well as season. Forests could support the stingless bee colony better than agriculture and home garden habitats. Insecticide (neonicotinoid) was barely recorded in both honey bees and stingless bees. View Full-Text
Keywords: Apis cerana; Apis mellifera; agriculture; forests; home garden; neonicotinoid; Tetragonula laeviceps Apis cerana; Apis mellifera; agriculture; forests; home garden; neonicotinoid; Tetragonula laeviceps
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Buchori, D.; Rizali, A.; Priawandiputra, W.; Sartiami, D.; Johannis, M. Population Growth and Insecticide Residues of Honey Bees in Tropical Agricultural Landscapes. Diversity 2020, 12, 1.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop