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Review

Anthocyanin-Rich Vegetables for Human Consumption—Focus on Potato, Sweetpotato and Tomato

1
USDA-ARS, Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705-2350, USA
2
Independent Researcher, Hyderabad 500016, India
3
Central Potato Research Institute, Shimla 171001, India
4
National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute, Mohali 160071, India
5
Department of Plant Breeding, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sundsvagen, 10 Box 190, SE 23422 Lomma, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Salvador Rosello and Jaime Cebolla-Cornejo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(5), 2634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052634
Received: 23 January 2022 / Revised: 12 February 2022 / Accepted: 25 February 2022 / Published: 27 February 2022
Malnutrition, unhealthy diets, and lifestyle changes have become major risk factors for non-communicable diseases while adversely impacting economic growth and sustainable development. Anthocyanins, a group of flavonoids that are rich in fruits and vegetables, contribute positively to human health. This review focuses on genetic variation harnessed through crossbreeding and biotechnology-led approaches for developing anthocyanins-rich fruit and vegetable crops. Significant progress has been made in identifying genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in various crops. Thus, the use of genetics has led to the development and release of anthocyanin-rich potato and sweet potato cultivars in Europe and the USA. The purple potato ’Kufri Neelkanth’ has been released for cultivation in northern India. In Europe, the anthocyanin-rich tomato cultivar ‘Sun Black’ developed via the introgression of Aft and atv genes has been released. The development of anthocyanin-rich food crops without any significant yield penalty has been due to the use of genetic engineering involving specific transcription factors or gene editing. Anthocyanin-rich food ingredients have the potential of being more nutritious than those devoid of anthocyanins. The inclusion of anthocyanins as a target characteristic in breeding programs can ensure the development of cultivars to meet the nutritional needs for human consumption in the developing world. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofortification; biosafety regulations; colored vegetables; flavonoids; gene editing; genetic tags; transgenes biofortification; biosafety regulations; colored vegetables; flavonoids; gene editing; genetic tags; transgenes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mattoo, A.K.; Dwivedi, S.L.; Dutt, S.; Singh, B.; Garg, M.; Ortiz, R. Anthocyanin-Rich Vegetables for Human Consumption—Focus on Potato, Sweetpotato and Tomato. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23, 2634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052634

AMA Style

Mattoo AK, Dwivedi SL, Dutt S, Singh B, Garg M, Ortiz R. Anthocyanin-Rich Vegetables for Human Consumption—Focus on Potato, Sweetpotato and Tomato. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2022; 23(5):2634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052634

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mattoo, Autar K., Sangam L. Dwivedi, Som Dutt, Brajesh Singh, Monika Garg, and Rodomiro Ortiz. 2022. "Anthocyanin-Rich Vegetables for Human Consumption—Focus on Potato, Sweetpotato and Tomato" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 23, no. 5: 2634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052634

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