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Open AccessArticle

Why Is the Invasive Plant Sphagneticola trilobata More Resistant to High Temperature Than Its Native Congener?

Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(2), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020748
Received: 21 December 2020 / Revised: 7 January 2021 / Accepted: 11 January 2021 / Published: 13 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tropical Plant Responses to Climate Change)
Climate change and invasive alien species threaten biodiversity. High temperature is a worrying ecological factor. Most responses of invasive plants aimed at coping with adversity are focused on the physiological level. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of an invasive plant (Sphagneticola trilobata L.) to high temperature, using a native species (Sphagneticola calendulacea L.) as the control, relevant indicators, including photosynthetic pigments, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, the antioxidant system, and related enzyme-coding genes were measured. The results showed that the leaves of S. calendulacea turned yellow, photosynthetic pigment content (Chl a, Chl b, Car, Chl) decreased, gas exchange (Pn) and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII) decreased under high temperature. It was also found that high temperature caused photoinhibition and a large amount of ROS accumulated, resulting in an increase in MDA and relative conductivity. Antioxidant enzymes (including SOD, POD, CAT, and APX) and antioxidants (including flavonoids, total phenols, and carotenoids) were decreased. The qPCR results further showed that the expression of the PsbP, PsbA, and RubiscoL, SOD, POD, CAT, and APX genes was downregulated, which was consistent with the results of physiological data. Otherwise, the resistance of S. trilobata to high temperature was better than that of S. calendulacea, which made it a superior plant in the invasion area. These results further indicated that the gradual warming of global temperature will greatly accelerate the invasion area of S. trilobata. View Full-Text
Keywords: high temperature stress; Sphagneticola; gene expression; photosynthesis high temperature stress; Sphagneticola; gene expression; photosynthesis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cai, M.; Lin, X.; Peng, J.; Zhang, J.; Chen, M.; Huang, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Ding, W.; Peng, C. Why Is the Invasive Plant Sphagneticola trilobata More Resistant to High Temperature Than Its Native Congener? Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 748. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020748

AMA Style

Cai M, Lin X, Peng J, Zhang J, Chen M, Huang J, Chen L, Sun F, Ding W, Peng C. Why Is the Invasive Plant Sphagneticola trilobata More Resistant to High Temperature Than Its Native Congener? International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(2):748. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020748

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cai, Minling; Lin, Xiaohua; Peng, Jindi; Zhang, Junjie; Chen, Minghao; Huang, Jundong; Chen, Lihua; Sun, Feng; Ding, Wenqiao; Peng, Changlian. 2021. "Why Is the Invasive Plant Sphagneticola trilobata More Resistant to High Temperature Than Its Native Congener?" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 22, no. 2: 748. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020748

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