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Review

The DNA Damage Response and HIV-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

1
Department of Medicine Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Cardiovascular Pulmonary Research Labs and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(9), 3305; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093305
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 4 May 2020 / Accepted: 5 May 2020 / Published: 7 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
The HIV-infected population is at a dramatically increased risk of developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating and fatal cardiopulmonary disease that is rare amongst the general population. It is increasingly apparent that PAH is a disease with complex and heterogeneous cellular and molecular pathologies, and options for therapeutic intervention are limited, resulting in poor clinical outcomes for affected patients. A number of soluble HIV factors have been implicated in driving the cellular pathologies associated with PAH through perturbations of various signaling and regulatory networks of uninfected bystander cells in the pulmonary vasculature. While these mechanisms are likely numerous and multifaceted, the overlapping features of PAH cellular pathologies and the effects of viral factors on related cell types provide clues as to the potential mechanisms driving HIV-PAH etiology and progression. In this review, we discuss the link between the DNA damage response (DDR) signaling network, chronic HIV infection, and potential contributions to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in chronically HIV-infected individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV; pulmonary arterial hypertension; endothelial; DNA damage; Tat; Nef HIV; pulmonary arterial hypertension; endothelial; DNA damage; Tat; Nef
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MDPI and ACS Style

Simenauer, A.; Nozik-Grayck, E.; Cota-Gomez, A. The DNA Damage Response and HIV-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093305

AMA Style

Simenauer A, Nozik-Grayck E, Cota-Gomez A. The DNA Damage Response and HIV-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(9):3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093305

Chicago/Turabian Style

Simenauer, Ari, Eva Nozik-Grayck, and Adela Cota-Gomez. 2020. "The DNA Damage Response and HIV-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 9: 3305. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093305

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