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Recent Developments in the Design of Non-Biofouling Coatings for Nanoparticles and Surfaces

1
Center for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials (CIC biomaGUNE), Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Paseo de Miramon 182, 20014 Donostia San Sebastián, Spain
2
Instituto Biofisika UPV/EHU, CSIC, Barrio Sarriena s/n, Leioa, E-48940 Bizkaia, Spain
3
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, UPV/EHU, Barrio Sarriena s/n, Leioa, E-48940 Bizkaia, Spain
4
Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(3), 1007; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031007
Received: 20 December 2019 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 31 January 2020 / Published: 3 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle Protein Corona and Its Biological Applications)
Biofouling is a major issue in the field of nanomedicine and consists of the spontaneous and unwanted adsorption of biomolecules on engineered surfaces. In a biological context and referring to nanoparticles (NPs) acting as nanomedicines, the adsorption of biomolecules found in blood (mostly proteins) is known as protein corona. On the one hand, the protein corona, as it covers the NPs’ surface, can be considered the biological identity of engineered NPs, because the corona is what cells will “see” instead of the underlying NPs. As such, the protein corona will influence the fate, integrity, and performance of NPs in vivo. On the other hand, the physicochemical properties of the engineered NPs, such as their size, shape, charge, or hydrophobicity, will influence the identity of the proteins attracted to their surface. In this context, the design of coatings for NPs and surfaces that avoid biofouling is an active field of research. The gold standard in the field is the use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules, although zwitterions have also proved to be efficient in preventing protein adhesion and fluorinated molecules are emerging as coatings with interesting properties. Hence, in this review, we will focus on recent examples of anti-biofouling coatings in three main areas, that is, PEGylated, zwitterionic, and fluorinated coatings. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein corona; anti-fouling; non-biofouling; PEG; zwitterion; fluorine; nanoparticles protein corona; anti-fouling; non-biofouling; PEG; zwitterion; fluorine; nanoparticles
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sanchez-Cano, C.; Carril, M. Recent Developments in the Design of Non-Biofouling Coatings for Nanoparticles and Surfaces. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 1007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031007

AMA Style

Sanchez-Cano C, Carril M. Recent Developments in the Design of Non-Biofouling Coatings for Nanoparticles and Surfaces. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(3):1007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031007

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Carril, Mónica. 2020. "Recent Developments in the Design of Non-Biofouling Coatings for Nanoparticles and Surfaces" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 3: 1007. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21031007

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