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Review

Risk Factors and Mouse Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture

1
The Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
2
Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
3
Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Townsville University Hospital, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(19), 7250; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21197250
Received: 24 June 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 28 August 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research On Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm)
Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is an important cause of death in older adults. In clinical practice, the most established predictor of AAA rupture is maximum AAA diameter. Aortic diameter is commonly used to assess AAA severity in mouse models studies. AAA rupture occurs when the stress (force per unit area) on the aneurysm wall exceeds wall strength. Previous research suggests that aortic wall structure and strength, biomechanical forces on the aorta and cellular and proteolytic composition of the AAA wall influence the risk of AAA rupture. Mouse models offer an opportunity to study the association of these factors with AAA rupture in a way not currently possible in patients. Such studies could provide data to support the use of novel surrogate markers of AAA rupture in patients. In this review, the currently available mouse models of AAA and their relevance to the study of AAA rupture are discussed. The review highlights the limitations of mouse models and suggests novel approaches that could be incorporated in future experimental AAA studies to generate clinically relevant results. View Full-Text
Keywords: abdominal aortic aneurysm; aneurysm rupture; rupture risk; aortic stiffness; peak wall stress; preclinical imaging abdominal aortic aneurysm; aneurysm rupture; rupture risk; aortic stiffness; peak wall stress; preclinical imaging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Murali Krishna, S.; Morton, S.K.; Li, J.; Golledge, J. Risk Factors and Mouse Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 7250. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21197250

AMA Style

Murali Krishna S, Morton SK, Li J, Golledge J. Risk Factors and Mouse Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(19):7250. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21197250

Chicago/Turabian Style

Murali Krishna, Smriti, Susan K. Morton, Jiaze Li, and Jonathan Golledge. 2020. "Risk Factors and Mouse Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 19: 7250. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21197250

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