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Antimicrobial Photoinactivation Approach Based on Natural Agents for Control of Bacteria Biofilms in Spacecraft

1
Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio av. 3, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania
2
Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Institute of Biosciences, Life Sciences Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio av. 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(18), 6932; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186932
Received: 31 August 2020 / Revised: 16 September 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 21 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell Death in Biology and Diseases)
A spacecraft is a confined system that is inhabited by a changing microbial consortium, mostly originating from life-supporting devices, equipment collected in pre-flight conditions, and crewmembers. Continuous monitoring of the spacecraft’s bioburden employing culture-based and molecular methods has shown the prevalence of various taxa, with human skin-associated microorganisms making a substantial contribution to the spacecraft microbiome. Microorganisms in spacecraft can prosper not only in planktonic growth mode but can also form more resilient biofilms that pose a higher risk to crewmembers’ health and the material integrity of the spacecraft’s equipment. Moreover, bacterial biofilms in space conditions are characterized by faster formation and acquisition of resistance to chemical and physical effects than under the same conditions on Earth, making most decontamination methods unsafe. There is currently no reported method available to combat biofilm formation in space effectively and safely. However, antibacterial photodynamic inactivation based on natural photosensitizers, which is reviewed in this work, seems to be a promising method. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibacterial photoinactivation; natural photosensitizers; spacecraft biofilm decontamination antibacterial photoinactivation; natural photosensitizers; spacecraft biofilm decontamination
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Buchovec, I.; Gricajeva, A.; Kalėdienė, L.; Vitta, P. Antimicrobial Photoinactivation Approach Based on Natural Agents for Control of Bacteria Biofilms in Spacecraft. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 6932.

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