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Knockout of ACTB and ACTG1 with CRISPR/Cas9(D10A) Technique Shows that Non-Muscle β and γ Actin Are Not Equal in Relation to Human Melanoma Cells’ Motility and Focal Adhesion Formation
Open AccessReview

Current Molecular Markers of Melanoma and Treatment Targets

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
2
Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
3
Department of Human Biology, Institute of Biology, Faculty of Biological and Veterinary Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń, Poland
4
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cancer Chemoprevention Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
5
Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103535
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 8 May 2020 / Accepted: 13 May 2020 / Published: 16 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biology of Melanoma)
Melanoma is a deadly skin cancer that becomes especially difficult to treat after it metastasizes. Timely identification of melanoma is critical for effective therapy, but histopathologic diagnosis can frequently pose a significant challenge to this goal. Therefore, auxiliary diagnostic tools are imperative to facilitating prompt recognition of malignant lesions. Melanoma develops as result of a number of genetic mutations, with UV radiation often acting as a mutagenic risk factor. Novel methods of genetic testing have improved detection of these molecular alterations, which subsequently revealed important information for diagnosis and prognosis. Rapid detection of genetic alterations is also significant for choosing appropriate treatment and developing targeted therapies for melanoma. This review will delve into the understanding of various mutations and the implications they may pose for clinical decision making. View Full-Text
Keywords: melanoma; molecular pathology; diagnosis; therapy; molecular testing; genetic mutations; UV irradiation melanoma; molecular pathology; diagnosis; therapy; molecular testing; genetic mutations; UV irradiation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, K.; Oak, A.S.W.; Slominski, R.M.; Brożyna, A.A.; Slominski, A.T. Current Molecular Markers of Melanoma and Treatment Targets. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 3535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103535

AMA Style

Yang K, Oak ASW, Slominski RM, Brożyna AA, Slominski AT. Current Molecular Markers of Melanoma and Treatment Targets. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(10):3535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103535

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yang, Kevin; Oak, Allen S.W.; Slominski, Radomir M.; Brożyna, Anna A.; Slominski, Andrzej T. 2020. "Current Molecular Markers of Melanoma and Treatment Targets" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 10: 3535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103535

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