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Open AccessReview

A Single Cell but Many Different Transcripts: A Journey into the World of Long Non-Coding RNAs

1
Department of Biology, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
2
CRIBI Biotechnology Center, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
3
CIR-Myo Myology Center, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(1), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010302
Received: 22 November 2019 / Revised: 17 December 2019 / Accepted: 23 December 2019 / Published: 1 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA Biogenesis and Function)
In late 2012 it was evidenced that most of the human genome is transcribed but only a small percentage of the transcripts are translated. This observation supported the importance of non-coding RNAs and it was confirmed in several organisms. The most abundant non-translated transcripts are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). In contrast to protein-coding RNAs, they show a more cell-specific expression. To understand the function of lncRNAs, it is fundamental to investigate in which cells they are preferentially expressed and to detect their subcellular localization. Recent improvements of techniques that localize single RNA molecules in tissues like single-cell RNA sequencing and fluorescence amplification methods have given a considerable boost in the knowledge of the lncRNA functions. In recent years, single-cell transcription variability was associated with non-coding RNA expression, revealing this class of RNAs as important transcripts in the cell lineage specification. The purpose of this review is to collect updated information about lncRNA classification and new findings on their function derived from single-cell analysis. We also retained useful for all researchers to describe the methods available for single-cell analysis and the databases collecting single-cell and lncRNA data. Tables are included to schematize, describe, and compare exposed concepts. View Full-Text
Keywords: single-cell; single-cell sequencing; single-cell expression; non-coding RNAs; long non-coding RNAs; lncRNAs; lncRNA database; single-cell database single-cell; single-cell sequencing; single-cell expression; non-coding RNAs; long non-coding RNAs; lncRNAs; lncRNA database; single-cell database
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alessio, E.; Bonadio, R.S.; Buson, L.; Chemello, F.; Cagnin, S. A Single Cell but Many Different Transcripts: A Journey into the World of Long Non-Coding RNAs. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 302. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010302

AMA Style

Alessio E, Bonadio RS, Buson L, Chemello F, Cagnin S. A Single Cell but Many Different Transcripts: A Journey into the World of Long Non-Coding RNAs. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(1):302. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010302

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alessio, Enrico; Bonadio, Raphael S.; Buson, Lisa; Chemello, Francesco; Cagnin, Stefano. 2020. "A Single Cell but Many Different Transcripts: A Journey into the World of Long Non-Coding RNAs" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 1: 302. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010302

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