Next Article in Journal
Glucose Transport and Transporters in the Endomembranes
Next Article in Special Issue
Decreased Blood Level of MFSD2a as a Potential Biomarker of Alzheimer’s Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Promising Therapeutic Efficacy of GC1118, an Anti-EGFR Antibody, against KRAS Mutation-Driven Colorectal Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts
Previous Article in Special Issue
Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Stroke Burden
Open AccessArticle

The Omega-3 Fatty Acids EPA and DHA, as a Part of a Murine High-Fat Diet, Reduced Lipid Accumulation in Brown and White Adipose Tissues

1
Division of Food and Nutrition Science, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden
2
Food and Biobased Products Group, AgResearch Institute, 7674 Lincoln, New Zealand
3
Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 5895; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20235895
Received: 3 October 2019 / Revised: 20 November 2019 / Accepted: 20 November 2019 / Published: 24 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Health and Disease: New Knowledge 2019)
Excess energy intake can trigger an uncontrolled inflammatory response, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disturbances that are hypothesised to contribute to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are suggested to mitigate this inflammatory response, but the mechanisms are unclear, especially at the tissue level. Adipose tissues, the first tissues to give an inflammatory response, may be an important target site of action for EPA and DHA. To evaluate the effects of EPA and DHA in white and brown adipose tissues, we fed male C57Bl/6J mice either a high fat diet (HFD) with 5% corn oil, an HFD with 40% of the corn oil substituted for purified EPA and DHA triglycerides (HFD-ED), or normal chow, for 8 weeks. Fatty acid profiling and transcriptomics were used to study how EPA and DHA affect retroperitoneal white and brown adipose tissues. HFD-ED fed mice showed reduced lipid accumulation and levels of the pro-inflammatory fatty acid arachidonic acid in both white and brown adipose tissues, compared with HFD-corn oil fed animals. The transcriptomic analysis showed changes in β-oxidation pathways, supporting the decreased lipid accumulation in the HFD-ED fed mice. Therefore, our data suggests that EPA and DHA supplementation of a high fat diet may be anti-inflammatory, as well as reduce lipid accumulation in adipose tissues. View Full-Text
Keywords: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); brown and white adipose tissue; gene expression profiling; signaling pathway; inflammation eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); brown and white adipose tissue; gene expression profiling; signaling pathway; inflammation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Soni, N.; Ross, A.B.; Scheers, N.; Nookaew, I.; Gabrielsson, B.G.; Sandberg, A.-S. The Omega-3 Fatty Acids EPA and DHA, as a Part of a Murine High-Fat Diet, Reduced Lipid Accumulation in Brown and White Adipose Tissues. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 5895.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop