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Open AccessArticle

The AtHSP17.4C1 Gene Expression Is Mediated by Diverse Signals that Link Biotic and Abiotic Stress Factors with ROS and Can Be a Useful Molecular Marker for Oxidative Stress

1
Plant Molecular Physiology and Biotechnology Group, Institute of Developmental and Molecular Biology of Plants, Heinrich Heine University, and Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Düsseldorf 40225, Germany
2
Botany Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527, Egypt
3
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Agriculture, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, St Lucia, Queensland 4067, Australia
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Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
5
Plant-Microbe Interactions Laboratory, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3201; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133201
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 26 June 2019 / Accepted: 27 June 2019 / Published: 29 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Redox Regulation in Plants)
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly controlled signaling species that are involved in regulating gene expression in response to different environmental cues. The production of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is a key strategy that plants use to defend themselves against diverse stresses, including oxidative stress. In this study, expression patterns of the Arabidopsis HSP17.4CI gene, a cytosolic class I small HSP, were systematically profiled under different abiotic, biotic and oxidative stresses. Our data show that HSP17.4CI was early and highly induced by heat, cold, salt, drought and high-light. HSP17.4CI also showed high expression levels in Arabidopsis plants infected with the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, but not in response to the necrotrophic pathogens Alternaria brassicicola and Fusarium oxysporum. Oxidative stress treatments including H2O2 and the herbicide methyl viologen led to induction of HSP17.4CI. The plant hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) induced the expression of HSP17.4CI, whereas methyl jasmonate (MJ) did not affect the expression level of this gene. Furthermore, we found enhanced expression of HSP17.4CI in catalase mutant plants, which are deficient in catalase 2 activity and accumulate intracellular H2O2. Taken together, data presented here suggest that HSP17.4CI expression is regulated by various signals that connect biotic and abiotic stresses with ROS and can be used as a molecular marker for oxidative stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: Reactive oxygen species; small heat shock proteins; abiotic stress; biotic stress; abscisic acid; salicylic acid Reactive oxygen species; small heat shock proteins; abiotic stress; biotic stress; abscisic acid; salicylic acid
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Sewelam, N.; Kazan, K.; Hüdig, M.; Maurino, V.G.; Schenk, P.M. The AtHSP17.4C1 Gene Expression Is Mediated by Diverse Signals that Link Biotic and Abiotic Stress Factors with ROS and Can Be a Useful Molecular Marker for Oxidative Stress. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 3201.

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