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Review

Signal Transduction in Ribosome Biogenesis: A Recipe to Avoid Disaster

1
Istituto di Genetica Molecolare-Luigi Luca Cavalli Sforza, UOS Bologna, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IGM-CNR), 40136 Bologna, Italy
2
IRCCS, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, 40136 Bologna, Italy
3
RNA Editing Laboratory, Dipartimento di Oncoematologia, IRCCS, Ospedale Pediatrica Bambino Gesù, 00146 Rome, Italy
4
Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie, Università di Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(11), 2718; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112718
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 30 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure, Function and Evolution of the Ribosome)
Energetically speaking, ribosome biogenesis is by far the most costly process of the cell and, therefore, must be highly regulated in order to avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. Not only must ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, ribosomal protein (RP) transcription, translation, and nuclear import, as well as ribosome assembly, be tightly controlled, these events must be coordinated with other cellular events, such as cell division and differentiation. In addition, ribosome biogenesis must respond rapidly to environmental cues mediated by internal and cell surface receptors, or stress (oxidative stress, DNA damage, amino acid depletion, etc.). This review examines some of the well-studied pathways known to control ribosome biogenesis (PI3K-AKT-mTOR, RB-p53, MYC) and how they may interact with some of the less well studied pathways (eIF2α kinase and RNA editing/splicing) in higher eukaryotes to regulate ribosome biogenesis, assembly, and protein translation in a dynamic manner. View Full-Text
Keywords: oncology; nucleus; TP53; PI3K-AKT-mTOR; PKR-eIF2α; MYC; RNA polymerase; RNA splicing; RNA editing; translation oncology; nucleus; TP53; PI3K-AKT-mTOR; PKR-eIF2α; MYC; RNA polymerase; RNA splicing; RNA editing; translation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Piazzi, M.; Bavelloni, A.; Gallo, A.; Faenza, I.; Blalock, W.L. Signal Transduction in Ribosome Biogenesis: A Recipe to Avoid Disaster. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 2718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112718

AMA Style

Piazzi M, Bavelloni A, Gallo A, Faenza I, Blalock WL. Signal Transduction in Ribosome Biogenesis: A Recipe to Avoid Disaster. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(11):2718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112718

Chicago/Turabian Style

Piazzi, Manuela, Alberto Bavelloni, Angela Gallo, Irene Faenza, and William L. Blalock. 2019. "Signal Transduction in Ribosome Biogenesis: A Recipe to Avoid Disaster" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 11: 2718. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112718

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