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Review

Applicability of an In-Vitro Digestion Model to Assess the Bioaccessibility of Phenolic Compounds from Olive-Related Products

Food and Health Omics, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Vigo, 32004-Ourense, Spain
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Academic Editors: Vanesa Benítez García, Yolanda Aguilera Gutiérrez and Alicia Gil-Ramírez
Molecules 2021, 26(21), 6667; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216667
Received: 22 September 2021 / Revised: 24 October 2021 / Accepted: 29 October 2021 / Published: 3 November 2021
The Mediterranean diet includes virgin olive oil (VOO) as the main fat and olives as snacks. In addition to providing nutritional and organoleptic properties, VOO and the fruits (olives) contain an extensive number of bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic compounds, which are considered to be powerful antioxidants. Furthermore, olive byproducts, such as olive leaves, olive pomace, and olive mill wastewater, considered also as rich sources of phenolic compounds, are now valorized due to being mainly applied in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. The digestive system must physically and chemically break down these ingested olive-related products to release their phenolic compounds, which will be further metabolized to be used by the human organism. The first purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of in-vitro static digestion models for olive-related products. In this sense, the in-vitro gastrointestinal digestion methods are widely used with the following aims: (i) to study how phenolic compounds are released from their matrices and to identify structural changes of phenolic compounds after the digestion of olive fruits and oils and (ii) to support the functional value of olive leaves and byproducts generated in the olive industry by assessing their health properties before and after the gastrointestinal process. The second purpose of this review is to survey and discuss all the results available to date. View Full-Text
Keywords: olive oil; table olives; olive byproducts; phenolic compounds; in-vitro digestion; bioaccessibility; bioavailability olive oil; table olives; olive byproducts; phenolic compounds; in-vitro digestion; bioaccessibility; bioavailability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reboredo-Rodríguez, P.; González-Barreiro, C.; Martínez-Carballo, E.; Cambeiro-Pérez, N.; Rial-Otero, R.; Figueiredo-González, M.; Cancho-Grande, B. Applicability of an In-Vitro Digestion Model to Assess the Bioaccessibility of Phenolic Compounds from Olive-Related Products. Molecules 2021, 26, 6667. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216667

AMA Style

Reboredo-Rodríguez P, González-Barreiro C, Martínez-Carballo E, Cambeiro-Pérez N, Rial-Otero R, Figueiredo-González M, Cancho-Grande B. Applicability of an In-Vitro Digestion Model to Assess the Bioaccessibility of Phenolic Compounds from Olive-Related Products. Molecules. 2021; 26(21):6667. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216667

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reboredo-Rodríguez, Patricia, Carmen González-Barreiro, Elena Martínez-Carballo, Noelia Cambeiro-Pérez, Raquel Rial-Otero, María Figueiredo-González, and Beatriz Cancho-Grande. 2021. "Applicability of an In-Vitro Digestion Model to Assess the Bioaccessibility of Phenolic Compounds from Olive-Related Products" Molecules 26, no. 21: 6667. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216667

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