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Yeast Smell Like What They Eat: Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds of Malassezia furfur in Growth Media Supplemented with Different Lipids

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Laboratory of Advanced Analytical Techniques in Natural Products (LATNAP), Universidad de los Andes, Cra 1 No. 18A-12, Bogotá 111711, Cundinamarca, Colombia
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Grupo de Investigación Celular y Molecular de Microorganismos Patógenos (CeMoP), Universidad de los Andes, Cra 1 No. 18A-12, Bogotá 111711, Cundinamarca, Colombia
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Laboratorio de Micología y Fitopatología (LAMFU), Universidad de los Andes, Cra 1 No. 18A-12, Bogotá 111711, Cundinamarca, Colombia
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Centro de Investigaciones en Microbiología y Parasitología Tropical (CIMPAT), Universidad de los Andes, Cra 1 No. 18A-12, Bogotá 111711, Cundinamarca, Colombia
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Igor Jerković
Molecules 2019, 24(3), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24030419
Received: 13 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 21 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Volatile Organic Compounds Research)
Malassezia furfur is part of the human skin microbiota. Its volatile organic compounds (VOCs) possibly contribute to the characteristic odour in humans, as well as to microbiota interaction. The aim of this study was to investigate how the lipid composition of the liquid medium influences the production of VOCs. Growth was performed in four media: (1) mDixon, (2) oleic acid (OA), (3) oleic acid + palmitic acid (OA+PA), and (4) palmitic acid (PA). The profiles of the VOCs were characterized by HS-SPME/GC-MS in the exponential and stationary phases. A total number of 61 VOCs was found in M. furfur, among which alkanes, alcohols, ketones, and furanic compounds were the most abundant. Some compounds previously reported for Malassezia (γ-dodecalactone, 3-methylbutan-1-ol, and hexan-1-ol) were also found. Through our experiments, using univariate and multivariate unsupervised (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA)) and supervised (Projection to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA)) statistical techniques, we have proven that each tested growth medium stimulates the production of a different volatiles profile in M. furfur. Carbon dioxide, hexan-1-ol, pentyl acetate, isomer5 of methyldecane, dimethyl sulphide, undec-5-ene, isomer2 of methylundecane, isomer1 of methyldecane, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran were established as differentiating compounds among treatments by all the techniques. The significance of our findings deserves future research to investigate if certain volatile profiles could be related to the beneficial or pathogenic role of this yeast. View Full-Text
Keywords: fungal VOCs; GC-MS; HS-SPME; lipids; exponential growth phase; stationary growth phase; oleic acid; palmitic acid fungal VOCs; GC-MS; HS-SPME; lipids; exponential growth phase; stationary growth phase; oleic acid; palmitic acid
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Gonzalez, M.; Celis, A.M.; Guevara-Suarez, M.I.; Molina, J.; Carazzone, C. Yeast Smell Like What They Eat: Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds of Malassezia furfur in Growth Media Supplemented with Different Lipids. Molecules 2019, 24, 419.

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