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Open AccessArticle

Anti-Biofilm Effects of Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides Against Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Planktonic Cells and Biofilm

1
Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sunchon National University, Suncheon, Jeonnam 57922, Korea
2
Department of Microbiology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52727, Korea
3
Division of Applied Life Sciences and Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828, Korea
4
National Institute of Ecology, 1210 Geumgang-ro, Maseo-myeon, Seocheon-gun 33657, Korea
5
The Research Institute for Sanitation and Environment of Coastal Areas, Sunchon National University, Suncheon, Jeonnam 57922, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Hirokazu Tamamura
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4560; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244560
Received: 16 November 2019 / Revised: 2 December 2019 / Accepted: 11 December 2019 / Published: 12 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peptide-Lead Drug Discovery)
Biofilm-associated infections are difficult to manage or treat as biofilms or biofilm-embedded bacteria are difficult to eradicate. Antimicrobial peptides have gained increasing attention as a possible alternative to conventional drugs to combat drug-resistant microorganisms because they inhibit the growth of planktonic bacteria by disrupting the cytoplasmic membrane. The current study investigated the effects of synthetic peptides (PS1-2, PS1-5, and PS1-6) and conventional antibiotics on the growth, biofilm formation, and biofilm reduction of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The effects of PS1-2, PS1-5, and PS1-6 were also tested in vivo using a mouse model. All peptides inhibited planktonic cell growth and biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. They also reduced preformed biofilm masses by removing the carbohydrates, extracellular DNA, and lipids that comprised extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) but did not affect proteins. In vivo, PS1-2 showed the greatest efficacy against preformed biofilms with no cytotoxicity. Our findings indicate that the PS1-2 peptide has potential as a next-generation therapeutic drug to overcome multidrug resistance and to regulate inflammatory response in biofilm-associated infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilm inhibition; synthetic antimicrobial peptide; drug-resistant bacteria; extracellular polymeric substances; biofilm degradation biofilm inhibition; synthetic antimicrobial peptide; drug-resistant bacteria; extracellular polymeric substances; biofilm degradation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, S.-C.; Lee, M.-Y.; Kim, J.-Y.; Kim, H.; Jung, M.; Shin, M.-K.; Lee, W.-K.; Cheong, G.-W.; Lee, J.R.; Jang, M.-K. Anti-Biofilm Effects of Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides Against Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus Planktonic Cells and Biofilm. Molecules 2019, 24, 4560.

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