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Recent Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel Methodology in Sample Preparation

1
Department of Radiopharmacy, Karolinska University Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
3
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden
4
Functional Materials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ahmad Mehdi and Sébastien Clément
Molecules 2019, 24(16), 2889; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24162889
Received: 20 June 2019 / Revised: 6 August 2019 / Accepted: 7 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sol-Gel Chemistry. From Molecule to Functional Materials)
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PDF [2149 KB, uploaded 9 August 2019]
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Abstract

Due to their selectivity and chemical stability, molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted great interest in sample preparation. Imprinted polymers have been applied for the extraction and the enrichment of different sorts of trace analytes in biological and environmental samples before their analysis. Additionally, MIPs are utilized in various sample preparation techniques such as SPE, SPME, SBSE and MEPS. Nevertheless, molecularly imprinted polymers suffer from thermal (stable only up to 150 °C) and mechanical stability issues, improper porosity and poor capacity. The sol-gel methodology as a promising alternative to address these limitations allowing the production of sorbents with controlled porosity and higher surface area. Thus the combination of molecularly imprinted technology and sol-gel technology can create influential materials with high selectivity, high capacity and high thermal stability. This work aims to present an overview of molecularly imprinted sol-gel polymerization methods and their applications in analytical and bioanalytical fields. View Full-Text
Keywords: molecularly imprinted polymers; sol-gel; solid phase extraction; solid phase microextraction; in-tip; monolithic column; nanofiber; magnetic nanoparticles; dummy molecularly imprinted polymers; sol-gel; solid phase extraction; solid phase microextraction; in-tip; monolithic column; nanofiber; magnetic nanoparticles; dummy
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Moein, M.M.; Abdel-Rehim, A.; Abdel-Rehim, M. Recent Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel Methodology in Sample Preparation. Molecules 2019, 24, 2889.

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