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Open AccessArticle

Reclamation of Fishery Processing Waste: A Mini-Review

1
Department of Chemistry, Tamkang University, New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan
2
Department of Science and Technology, Tay Nguyen University, Buon Ma Thuot 630000, Vietnam
3
Institute of Biotechnology and Environment, Tay Nguyen University, Buon Ma Thuot 630000, Vietnam
4
Life Science Development Center, Tamkang University, New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2019, 24(12), 2234; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24122234
Received: 6 May 2019 / Revised: 11 June 2019 / Accepted: 13 June 2019 / Published: 14 June 2019
Seafood such as fish, shellfish, and squid are a unique source of nutrients. However, many marine processing byproducts, such as viscera, shells, heads, and bones, are discarded, even though they are rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive nitrogenous components. Based on emerging evidence of their potential health benefits, these components show significant promise as functional food ingredients. Fish waste components contain significant levels of high-quality protein, which represents a source for biofunctional peptide mining. The chitin contained in shrimp shells, crab shells, and squid pens may also be of value. The components produced by bioconversion are reported to have antioxidative, antimicrobial, anticancer, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and anticoagulant activities. This review provides an overview of the extraordinary potential of processing fish and chitin-containing seafood byproducts via chemical procedures, enzymatic and fermentation technologies, and chemical modifications, as well as their applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioactive compounds; food byproducts; green extraction technologies; bioconversion bioactive compounds; food byproducts; green extraction technologies; bioconversion
MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, C.-H.; Doan, C.T.; Nguyen, V.B.; Nguyen, A.D.; Wang, S.-L. Reclamation of Fishery Processing Waste: A Mini-Review. Molecules 2019, 24, 2234.

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