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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Recent Developments in C–H Activation for Materials Science in the Center for Selective C–H Activation

1
School of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3
Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
4
Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mario Leclerc
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 922; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040922
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 10 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Direct (Hetero)Arylation: A New Tool for Organic Electronics)
Organic electronics is a rapidly growing field driven in large part by the synthesis of π-conjugated molecules and polymers. Traditional aryl cross-coupling reactions such as the Stille and Suzuki have been used extensively in the synthesis of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, but the synthesis of intermediates necessary for traditional cross-couplings can include multiple steps with toxic and hazardous reagents. Direct arylation through C–H bond activation has the potential to reduce the number of steps and hazards while being more atom-economical. Within the Center for Selective C–H Functionalization (CCHF), we have been developing C–H activation methodology for the synthesis of π-conjugated materials of interest, including direct arylation of difficult-to-functionalize electron acceptor intermediates and living polymerization of π-conjugated polymers through C–H activation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Keywords: π-conjugated materials; electron-acceptors; direct arylation; C–H activation; living polymerization Keywords: π-conjugated materials; electron-acceptors; direct arylation; C–H activation; living polymerization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, J.; Kang, L.J.; Parker, T.C.; Blakey, S.B.; Luscombe, C.K.; Marder, S.R. Recent Developments in C–H Activation for Materials Science in the Center for Selective C–H Activation. Molecules 2018, 23, 922. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040922

AMA Style

Zhang J, Kang LJ, Parker TC, Blakey SB, Luscombe CK, Marder SR. Recent Developments in C–H Activation for Materials Science in the Center for Selective C–H Activation. Molecules. 2018; 23(4):922. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040922

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Junxiang; Kang, Lauren J.; Parker, Timothy C.; Blakey, Simon B.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Marder, Seth R. 2018. "Recent Developments in C–H Activation for Materials Science in the Center for Selective C–H Activation" Molecules 23, no. 4: 922. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040922

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