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Article

Chemical Composition of Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) Berries Essential Oils as Observed in a Collection of Genotypes

by 1,†, 2,†, 2,† and 3,*,†
1
Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Via Muroni 23/A, I-07100 Sassari, Italy
2
Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, National Research Council (CNR), Trav. La Crucca 3, 07100 Sassari, Italy
3
Department of Agriculture, University of Sassari, Via De Nicola 9, I-07100 Sassari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Luca Forti
Molecules 2018, 23(10), 2502; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102502
Received: 27 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Recent Advances in Flavors and Fragrances)
Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) is a shrub spontaneously growing in the Mediterranean area. The leaf and fruit content of essential oils and phenolic compounds justify the wide use of the plant as medicinal and aromatic. Because of overexploitation of wild plants, a domestication process is in progress in different regions and the influence of the genotype variability on the chemical composition of fruit essential oils may be useful to breeding programs. Consequently, the analysis performed on a selected group of candidate clones growing in the same field collection in Sardinia is the object of this report. Forty-seven selections provided fully ripe fruits for essential oil extraction by hydrodistillation and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Only five candidate clones showed white fruits. The highest yield of essential oil was observed in the LAC31 genotype with 0.55 g·kg−1, while the samples BOS1, MON5, RUM4, RUM10, V4 and V8 showed values above 0.20 g·kg−1 and most of the genotypes under 0.10 g·kg−1. Geranyl acetate was the compound with the highest relative abundance. The second compound for relative abundance was the 1,8-cineole. Other compounds with high relative abundance were α-terpinyl acetate, methyleugenol, linalool, α-terpineol, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, Trans-caryophyllene oxide, and humulene epoxide II. View Full-Text
Keywords: Myrtaceae family; myrtle fruit; volatile composition; GC-MS; genetic variability Myrtaceae family; myrtle fruit; volatile composition; GC-MS; genetic variability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Usai, M.; Marchetti, M.; Culeddu, N.; Mulas, M. Chemical Composition of Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) Berries Essential Oils as Observed in a Collection of Genotypes. Molecules 2018, 23, 2502. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102502

AMA Style

Usai M, Marchetti M, Culeddu N, Mulas M. Chemical Composition of Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) Berries Essential Oils as Observed in a Collection of Genotypes. Molecules. 2018; 23(10):2502. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102502

Chicago/Turabian Style

Usai, Marianna, Mauro Marchetti, Nicola Culeddu, and Maurizio Mulas. 2018. "Chemical Composition of Myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) Berries Essential Oils as Observed in a Collection of Genotypes" Molecules 23, no. 10: 2502. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102502

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