Special Issue "Decolonizing Methodologies"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Madine VanderPlaat
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Guest Editor
Department of Sociology & Criminology, 923 Robie St., Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Interests: Immigrant women, children and families; social exclusion; health equity; citizen participation; feminist methodologies
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Giampietro Gobo
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Guest Editor
Faculty Studi Umanistici, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Festa del Perdono 7 - 20122 Milano, Italia
Interests: qualitative methods; quantitative methods; marketing research; epistemology; organization studies; management studies; sociology of science; phenomenology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 1999, the seminal work of Linda Tuhiwai Smith brought to light the numerous ways in which colonial attitudes are imbedded in Western epistemologies and called for the creation and celebration of indigenous research practices. Over the last 15 years, there has been a slow but steady growth in scholarship focusing on decolonizing methodologies, but, to date, very little has been published in mainstream Western methodology journals. This Special Issue of Societies seeks to create a space for researchers from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and indigenous communities in North America, Australia and Oceania to submit manuscripts reflecting on their decolonizing research practices particularly in terms of:

(1)     the cultural context within which their research projects are conducted;
(2)     the limitations of western methodologies
(3)     the creation of new indigenous epistemological perspectives
(4)     new data collection methods
(5)     new data analysis techniques.

Readers of Societies are encouraged to forward this call for papers to colleagues who engage in non-Western research practices and who face limited venues for featuring their work.

Prof. Dr. Madine VanderPlaat
Prof. Dr. Giampietro Gobo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • decolonizing methodologies
  • indigenous methods
  • non-Western epistemologies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Indigenous Research and Romantic Nationalism
Societies 2016, 6(4), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc6040034 - 21 Nov 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
In recent years, “indigenous research” and “indigenous methods” have become prominent themes in the general field of qualitative methodology. These ideas and their implications raise serious questions for the wider conduct of social research. We will outline some of those ideas, subjecting them [...] Read more.
In recent years, “indigenous research” and “indigenous methods” have become prominent themes in the general field of qualitative methodology. These ideas and their implications raise serious questions for the wider conduct of social research. We will outline some of those ideas, subjecting them to scrutiny, and ultimately using them to question the rise of Romanticism in contemporary social methodology. We develop these ideas to question the contemporary emphasis on the personal and the experiential in current methodological commentary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decolonizing Methodologies)
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