Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 9179

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Department, Leeds Arts University, Leeds LS2 9AQ, UK
Interests: art and design; arts-based methods; widening participation; access; higher education; democratic education; Basil Bernstein
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Department, Leeds Arts University, Leeds LS2 9AQ, UK
Interests: practice-based research; consumer culture; social media; selfies; psychoanalysis; marxism; feminism; fine art; lens-based media
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue aims to present the diversity of ontological approaches within the field of practice-based research. It also intends to discuss the usefulness—or otherwise—of notions such as validity, reliability and generalisability in relation to these research methods. Contributors may also explore different modes of understanding research rigor within a creative context.  

Practice-based research is a broad term that encompasses many forms. Possible approaches include arts-based research, arts-informed research, practice-based research, participatory research, action research, artful research, Arts-Based Action Research (ABAR) and a/r/tography. It is hoped that contributions will come from a variety of discipline areas, including—but not limited to—contemporary art, design, fashion, textiles, graphics, lens-based media, creative education and animation. Examples from interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary research areas are encouraged. We value accounts that demonstrate a clear research narrative, addressing issues concerning the way the insights resulting from an inquiry can be meaningfully related to different contexts. 

Articles from researchers, practitioners and research students are welcomed, they should be between 5000 and 7000 words, with images. It is the responsibility of the contributor to gain the right permissions for third-party material. Participants should be treated ethically.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Arts.

Prof. Dr. Samantha Broadhead
Dr. Dawn Woolley
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • art and design
  • practice-based research
  • arts-based research
  • participatory research
  • arts-based
  • action research

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

27 pages, 7405 KiB  
Article
Informing the Design of an Accessible Arabic Typeface: A Visual Analysis to Identify Letterform Features of Dyslexia-Friendly Typefaces
by Muneera Mohamed Hejres and Amanda J. Tinker
Societies 2024, 14(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14040045 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1409
Abstract
Dyslexia-friendly typefaces for the Latin script have been proliferating during the past decade. The typefaces are designed to tackle the challenges faced in a dyslexic reading experience by manipulating their letter forms and typographic attributes; several studies reported a positive effect on the [...] Read more.
Dyslexia-friendly typefaces for the Latin script have been proliferating during the past decade. The typefaces are designed to tackle the challenges faced in a dyslexic reading experience by manipulating their letter forms and typographic attributes; several studies reported a positive effect on the reading experience. To this date, no working dyslexia-friendly Arabic typefaces are available for the public. The present study is part of a larger practice-based research, where a novel dyslexia-friendly Arabic typeface is designed using a user-centred design approach. The current visual analysis marks the developmental phase, identifying the letterform features of dyslexia-friendly Latin typefaces that can be mapped to the Arabic script. This article explores the typographic features of dyslexia-friendly Latin typefaces by conducting a qualitative visual analysis; a proposed modified version of Leeuwen’s Typographic Distinctive Features Framework is employed. The results are discussed considering the Arabic script’s visual implications in a dyslexic reading experience. The findings of this study are used to create a list of design considerations for a dyslexia-friendly Arabic typeface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1004 KiB  
Article
Beyond Words: Tapping the Potential of Digital Diaries While Exploring Young Adults’ Experiences on Apps
by Rita Alcaire, Ana Marta M. Flores and Eduardo Antunes
Societies 2024, 14(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14030040 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1620
Abstract
In the dynamic landscape of online interactions, this article explores the use of digital diaries to unravel the intricacy of Portugal young adults’ experiences within the realm of apps and their connection to gender dynamics. By designing a digital participatory research method, we [...] Read more.
In the dynamic landscape of online interactions, this article explores the use of digital diaries to unravel the intricacy of Portugal young adults’ experiences within the realm of apps and their connection to gender dynamics. By designing a digital participatory research method, we were able to reflect on the participants’ experiences in maintaining the requested diaries, scrutinize the major themes in the narratives generated through this approach, and examine how participants interacted with the prompts sent to them. Therefore, we delved into how participants both challenged and (re)negotiated these solicitations and how their agency led to an untapped reservoir of insights for the project in ways that went beyond words. There were visual and non-verbal elements that brought insights into young adults’ interactions with mobile applications, offering a comprehensive exploration of four key themes: mobile apps as part of young adults’ routines, between performance and authenticity, making the diaries their own, and elaborating on feelings. We also explored diary methods at the convergence of various disciplines and their high potential for contributing to topics related to gender, mental health, productivity, relationships, online identity management, apps in everyday life, intimacy, and more in creative ways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 3317 KiB  
Article
Oops, I Did It Again! The Humour of Incongruity, Risk-Taking and Creativity in Art Practice and Everyday Life
by Philip Welding
Societies 2024, 14(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14030035 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1492
Abstract
This article explores the incongruous results of creativity and risk-taking within art practice and everyday life as encountered through the photographic image. The impetus for this study was a humorous experience that took place during health and safety training that raised questions about [...] Read more.
This article explores the incongruous results of creativity and risk-taking within art practice and everyday life as encountered through the photographic image. The impetus for this study was a humorous experience that took place during health and safety training that raised questions about the role of humour within everyday life. Research was conducted into two forms of visual media, including pamphlets and guides from the British Safety Council (BSC) archives and viral images that demonstrate accidents (tagged with an ‘epic fail’ hashtag). This led to a practice-based approach to research involving the production of photographic works for an exhibition that tested the role of risk-taking and improvisation within the creative process. This article uses humour theory including superiority, incongruity and relief theory in relation to Louise Peacock’s model for the analysis of slapstick, to analyse these different types of photographs and draws comparisons between the risk-taking creative behaviours of both employees and artists. These creative approaches are considered in relation to Michel de Certeau’s notion of tactics within everyday life. Ordinary thinking and improvisational tactics are present within both art and work, and improvisation heightens the potential for risk-taking. This may lead to incongruities represented through a photograph which can impact the viewer’s engagement through humour, fascination or self-reflexivity. It is proposed that the viewer response to images containing risk is made up of a balance between an embodied understanding of the dangers and an awareness of the artifice, which can shift depending on the conditions of the photograph’s production and display. The peculiarities of the photograph are seen as conducive to a humour response because of the photograph’s ambiguous relationship with the reality that it represents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 6723 KiB  
Article
Connected Art Practice: Transformative Learning Environments for Transdisciplinary Competences
by Dan Norton, Frances-Ann Norton and Stella Veciana
Societies 2024, 14(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14030033 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1611
Abstract
This article explores the implementation of Connected Art Practice in diverse learning environments, serving as an immersive entry point for students and researchers to develop collaborative transdisciplinary skills. This innovative approach integrates audio, educational, and sustainability research, employing sound-interaction methods applied to tangible [...] Read more.
This article explores the implementation of Connected Art Practice in diverse learning environments, serving as an immersive entry point for students and researchers to develop collaborative transdisciplinary skills. This innovative approach integrates audio, educational, and sustainability research, employing sound-interaction methods applied to tangible objects. Participants engage in exploring the interplay between objects representing interests or values, fostering the creation of a visual and linguistic network of interconnectedness. Inspired by artistic research, particularly Dérive, the practice provides experiences of connectedness to others and the environment, intertwined with reflections and discussions that foster a community of inquiry. This community collaboratively designs shared practices or projects, encouraging a holistic approach to transformative learning, addressing heterogeneity, complexity, authenticity, critical awareness, and emotional connectedness. All three case studies utilized qualitative analysis in artistic and academic settings. Datasets were collected in case study two from group discussion, participant observation, press releases and documentary photographs. In case studies one and three, audio–visual recordings, participant observation, field notes, and photo-documentation were collected. This study demonstrates that “Connected Art Practice” enhances competences in artistic expression, communication, and collaboration across disciplinary, social, and cultural boundaries. Specifically, it contributes to creative reinvention, personal sharing, self-reflection, and the capacity to co-design diverse projects. The paper concludes by discussing findings and pointing out the essential qualities of Connected Art, providing insights and resources for educational and research institutions seeking to foster transdisciplinary engagement and transformative learning in their curricular activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 575 KiB  
Article
A Conversation about Ethics: A Deliberative and Practice-Based Approach to Ethics in Arts Education
by Samantha Broadhead, Karen Tobias-Green and Sharon Hooper
Societies 2023, 13(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13020039 - 7 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1788
Abstract
This article reports on a practice-based research project that examined the various orientations of practice to ethical deliberation. The aim was to produce a film that captured ethical debate between two creative practitioners as they walked through their local streets. The film would [...] Read more.
This article reports on a practice-based research project that examined the various orientations of practice to ethical deliberation. The aim was to produce a film that captured ethical debate between two creative practitioners as they walked through their local streets. The film would be a catalyst for staff and students at an arts institution to think about their own ethical practices. The approach taken was based on Aristotelian notions of phronesis or practical wisdom, which is concerned with making ethical judgments based on deliberation. Issues were raised by the project, such as the tensions between policy and practice and the tensions between aesthetic considerations and ethical practice. Questions about the value of narrative, representation, and learning through doing were raised by the work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visual Arts and Design: Practice-Based Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop