Recent Advancement in Cardiovascular Diseases

A special issue of Reports (ISSN 2571-841X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 7802

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Molecular Medicine, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
Interests: heart failure; cardiovascular diseases; molecular medicine; epigenetic; pharmacology; natural products; cell signaling; transcription factor; onco-cardiology; hypertension

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in all countries. When stress such as hypertension or myocardial infarction is applied to the heart, the heart tries to compensate by cardiac remodeling including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy or fibrosis. However, these responses are limited compensatory mechanisms and, if stress continues, it eventually leads to heart failure with decreased cardiac function. Many underlying diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking are involved in the onset and progression of arteriosclerosis and heart disease. Treatment of these underlying disorders is extremely important. Recently, it has become clear that COVID-19 causes cardiovascular diseases, but a specific treatment method for it has not yet been developed. Therefore, in this Special Issue, we are waiting for submissions of case reports of cardiovascular diseases and basic and clinical research. Original research and review articles are also welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Tatsuya Morimoto
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • heart failure
  • myocardial infarction
  • hypertension
  • myocarditis
  • atherosclerosis
  • COVID-19
  • Smoking

Published Papers (4 papers)

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14 pages, 741 KiB  
Article
Coronary Artery Disease Is Related to Methylation Disorders Caused by the c.1286A>C MTHFR Polymorphism and to Low Serum 5-MTHF and Folic Acid Concentrations—Preliminary Results
by Agnieszka Pietruszyńska-Reszetarska, Robert Pietruszyński, Ireneusz Majsterek, Tomasz Popławski, Maciej Skrzypek, Beata Kolesińska, Joanna Waśko, Joanna Kapusta, Cezary Watała and Robert Irzmański
Reports 2024, 7(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7010006 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in gene encoding is the key enzyme in the folates pathway, methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which causes methylation disorders associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated associations between methylation disorders caused by MTHFR gene polymorphisms and the blood folate [...] Read more.
Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in gene encoding is the key enzyme in the folates pathway, methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which causes methylation disorders associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated associations between methylation disorders caused by MTHFR gene polymorphisms and the blood folate concentrations (folic acid, 5-MTHF) in CAD patients. Methods: Study group: 34 patients with CAD confirmed by invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Controls: 14 patients without CAD symptoms or significant coronary artery stenosis, based on ICA or multislice computed tomography (MSCT) with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring. Real-time PCR genotyping was assessed using TaqMan™ probes. Folic acid and 5-MTHF concentrations in blood serum were determined using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS). Results: The c.[1286A>C];[1286A>C] MTHFR polymorphism occurred significantly more often in (CAD+) patients compared to the (CAD) cohort and to the selected general European “CEU_GENO_PANEL” population sample. The concentration of 5-MTHF and folic acid in subgroups of CAD+ patients with methylation disorders categorized by genotypes and CAD presence (CAD+) was always lower in CAD+ subgroups compared to non-CAD individuals (CAD). Conclusions: Further studies on a larger scale are needed to implicate the homozygous c.1286A>C MTHFR variant as CAD genetic marker and the 5-MTHF as CAD biomarker. Identification of high CAD risk using genetic and phenotypic tests can contribute to personalized therapy using an active (methylated) form of folic acid (5-MTHF) in CAD patients with MTHFR polymorphisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancement in Cardiovascular Diseases)
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16 pages, 1724 KiB  
Article
Transvenous Lead Extraction in a European Low-Volume Center without On-Site Surgical Support
by Mohamed Dardari, Corneliu Iorgulescu, Vlad Bataila, Alexandru Deaconu, Eliza Cinteza, Radu Vatasescu, Paul Padovani, Corina Maria Vasile and Maria Dorobantu
Reports 2023, 6(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6030041 - 7 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Indications for cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are increasing. Almost one-third of device-related infections are endocarditis. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) has emerged as an effective and safe approach for treating device-related infections and complications. Multiple types of extraction tools are being used worldwide. [...] Read more.
Indications for cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are increasing. Almost one-third of device-related infections are endocarditis. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) has emerged as an effective and safe approach for treating device-related infections and complications. Multiple types of extraction tools are being used worldwide. Our goal is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of TLE using non-powered extraction tools. The study included patients between October 2018 and July 2022 requiring TLE according to EHRA expert consensus recommendations on lead extraction. A total of 88 consecutive patients were included. Indications for TLE included device-related infections in 74% of the patients. Of those, 32% had device-related endocarditis with or without sepsis. Staphylococcus Aureus was the most frequent pathogen in patients with endocarditis and positive bacteremia, and 57% had negative bloodstream cultures. A total of 150 cardiac pacing and defibrillator leads were targeted for extraction. The mean dwell time for leads was 6.92 ± 4.4 years; 52.8% were older than 5 years, 15.8% were older than ten years, and the longest lead dwell time was 26 years. Patients’ age varied between 18 and 98, with a mean age of 66 ± 16 years. Sixty-seven percent of patients were males. Using only non-powered extraction tools, we report 93.3% complete lead removal and 99% clinical success with partial extraction. We report no procedure-related death nor major complications. Minor complication incidence was 6.8%, and all complications resolved spontaneously. The 30-day mortality rate was 3.4%. TLE using non-powered extraction tools is safe and effective even without surgical backup on site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancement in Cardiovascular Diseases)
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11 pages, 864 KiB  
Article
Nurses’ Beliefs and Barriers of Delivering Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation for Heart Failure Patients in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Eidan M. Alzahrani
Reports 2022, 5(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports5040044 - 1 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1984
Abstract
Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) may benefit greatly from cardiopulmonary rehabilitation (CR), which is provided by a team of healthcare professionals that often includes nurses. There has been no research on how nurses perceive providing CR or the hurdles that may affect [...] Read more.
Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) may benefit greatly from cardiopulmonary rehabilitation (CR), which is provided by a team of healthcare professionals that often includes nurses. There has been no research on how nurses perceive providing CR or the hurdles that may affect referrals. Methods: All registered nurses in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province were given access to a cross-sectional online survey consisting of nine multiple-choice questions that address attitudes, beliefs, and barriers to CR for HF patients in Saudi Arabia. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the respondents. Results: Altogether, 439 registered nurses participated in the online survey, with men making up 194 (44%) and women 245 (56%). The mean and SD of years of clinical experience in caring for patients with HF were 6 ± 5 years. Out of 439 nurses, 107 (24%) strongly agree, and 255 (58%) agree that CR will enhance the physical fitness of patients. However, 94 (21.1%) strongly agree, and 248 (56.4%) agree that CR might alleviate dyspnea in HF patients. The vast majority of the nurses either strongly agree (90 (20.5%)) or agree (240 (55%)), that CR would help reduce palpitations and fatigue in HF patients. Indeed, 87 (19.81%) strongly agree, and 262 (59.68%) agree that CR would help improve HF patients’ ability to perform daily activities, while 51 (11.6%) strongly agree and 223 (51%) agree that CR would help in reducing hospital readmission. It was shown that 360 (82%) of the 439 nurses favored the delivery of CR programs in hospital-supervised programs, while 368 (83.8%) ranked information on HF disease as the most important aspect of the CR program, followed by information about medications at 305 (69.4%). The availability of CR facilities (36%), the cost of therapy (35%), and the absence of an established standardized referring strategy (34%) were identified as the most significant barriers affecting the referral of patients with HF for CR by nurses. Conclusion: Generally, nurses believed CR helped improve desired clinical outcomes in HF patients. Although a hospital-based program with close supervision is optimal for administering CR, few such options exist. Referrals of patients with HF were hampered by the lack of CR facilities, the cost of intervention, and the lack of a systematic approach to referrals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancement in Cardiovascular Diseases)
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8 pages, 780 KiB  
Case Report
A Bridge to Nowhere: Enabling Autonomy in a Case of Failed ECMO Rescue of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity
by James Hall, Michael Khilkin, Sara Murphy and George Botros
Reports 2023, 6(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6010017 - 20 Mar 2023
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Abstract
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be a life-saving intervention in cases of potentially reversible refractory respiratory failure. One such indication can be bleomycin-induced lung injury. However, in some cases, the injury can be so severe that it becomes irreversible and creates complex medical [...] Read more.
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be a life-saving intervention in cases of potentially reversible refractory respiratory failure. One such indication can be bleomycin-induced lung injury. However, in some cases, the injury can be so severe that it becomes irreversible and creates complex medical decisions regarding life support and the continuation of care when no additional therapeutic options are feasible, particularly in cases of patients who were young and fully functional prior to an acute illness. In cases of full pulmonary replacement with mechanical support and the degree of functionality that can be attained utilizing modalities such as ECMO can obscure the true severity of illness and make end-of-life decisions significantly harder for families and caregivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancement in Cardiovascular Diseases)
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