Special Issue "Religion and Transformation in Contemporary World"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christian Danz

Protestant Theological Faculty, University of Vienna, Schenkenstra├če 8-10, A-1010 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Philosophy of Religion; Dogmatics in Modern Times; German Idealism; History of Modern Theology; Theology of Religions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The issue deals with the change of religion in the contemporary world and the question for a concept of religion. As the debates of the last few years have made clearly, reflection on religious pluralism cannot be done in abstraction from the perspective of the participant. Theories of religion like the pluralistic one remove the participant perspective from the concept of religion and dissolve the historical religions into a comprehensive, abstract concept. Religion exists solely in its individual performance and symbolic self-presentation. Religion cannot be understood independently of its performance – for instance, as a fixed truth or a salvation at hand. Yet, religion can also not be functionally determined. In those theories that abstract from the self-understanding of the agents, it is the theorist who decides whether or not religion is present. However, over against substantial and functional theories, religion is to be understood as a historically developed, human self-understanding, which describes itself as such. Religion is not an essential, anthropological feature in any way constitutive of the human. Rather, it emerges underivably as a mode of human self-understanding by taking up and transforming historically handed-down forms.

The purpose of the special issue is to give an overview of the contemporary debates of religion and bringing together some of the most important current concepts of religion against the background of the transformation of religion in the global world. In three parts this topic will be discussed: 1. The Transformation of Religion in the Contemporary World, 2. Modern Debates about Religion, 3. Religious Pluralism.

Prof. Dr. Christian Danz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charges (APCs) of 550 CHF (Swiss Francs) per published paper are partially funded by institutions through Knowledge Unlatched for a limited number of papers per year. Please contact the editorial office before submission to check whether KU waivers, or discounts are still available. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transformation of Religion
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Religion and Modernity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Guwonpa, WMSCOG, and Shincheonji: Three Dynamic Grassroots Groups in Contemporary Korean Christian NRM History
Religions 2019, 10(3), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10030212
Received: 5 February 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 11 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
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Abstract
The new religious movements (NRMs) initially emerged in the regional societies of East Asia in the middle nineteenth and early twentieth centuries including Joseon (Korea). The socio-political transformation from feudalism to modernisation emaciated the religiosity of the traditional beliefs (Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, shamanism, [...] Read more.
The new religious movements (NRMs) initially emerged in the regional societies of East Asia in the middle nineteenth and early twentieth centuries including Joseon (Korea). The socio-political transformation from feudalism to modernisation emaciated the religiosity of the traditional beliefs (Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, shamanism, and folk religions). Colonial Korea experienced the major turning point in which various syncretic NRMs surfaced with alternative visions and teachings. What is, then, the historical origin of Christian NRMs? Who are their leaders? What is their background? What is the main figure of the teachings? How did they survive? This paper explores the history of Korean Christian new religious movements from the 1920s Wonsan mystical movements to 1990s urban and campus movements. Through the contextual studies of denominational background, birth, founder, membership, key teachings, evangelical strategy, phenomenon, services, sacred rituals, globalisation, and media, the three grassroots groups of Guwonpa (Salvation Sect: Good News Mission), WMSCOG (World Mission Society Church of God), and Shincheonji Church of Jesus the Temple of the Tabernacle of the Testimony (SCJ) are argued as the most controversial yet well-globalised organisations among Christian NRMs in contemporary Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Transformation in Contemporary World)
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Open AccessArticle Thinking Spirituality Differently: Michel Foucault on Spiritual Self-Practices, Counter-Conducts, and Power-Knowledge Constellations
Religions 2019, 10(2), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10020081
Received: 23 December 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 28 January 2019
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Abstract
In contemporary debates on the so-called “return of religion” in new forms and practices of spirituality, the spiritual practices are often seen as emerging on the ruins of a fragmented and outdated religious tradition. In this article an attempt is made to conceptualize [...] Read more.
In contemporary debates on the so-called “return of religion” in new forms and practices of spirituality, the spiritual practices are often seen as emerging on the ruins of a fragmented and outdated religious tradition. In this article an attempt is made to conceptualize spirituality beyond the religion-secularization divide. An alternative perspective on spirituality is developed through a reading of Michel Foucault’s writings and lectures on spiritual practices in antique philosophy and in Christianity. In this perspective the modalities of individual spiritual practices are largely dependent on interactions with dominant power-knowledge regimes and problematizations of individual lives. This article argues that this perspective on the spiritual practices in the West has the potential of making a valuable contribution to interpretations of present-day spirituality and lived religiosity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Transformation in Contemporary World)
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