Special Issue "Religion and Crime"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 4177

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Lee Ross
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Community Innovation and Education, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
Interests: domestic violence and race; crime, and justice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While a great deal of research on religion and crime has appeared in recent decades, there is little in the field that pulls together the scholarship and writings on the reformative powers of religious and spirituality-based programs toward reducing recidivism, nor are there many books that bring together the work of international scholars. This will be a comparative volume that features research spanning continents, religions, and time periods, with a specific focus on religious and spirituality-based programs that rehabilitate and help offenders avoid committing crime. Programs and interventions can result from a variety of settings unique to both adult and juvenile justice systems, including law enforcement, courts, and corrections.

The aim of this volume is to bring together some of the most current and ground-breaking work on religious and spirituality-based programs across several continents. While there have been some important anthologies of essays on religion-based rehabilitation programs and crime (Akin and Dryer, 2017; Angela, 2010; Igor, 2015; James, 2009; Foucault, 1975; Laur, 2014, among others), I am unaware of recent attempts to bring them together into one volume. Essays on single figures or texts are also welcomed, as are comparative essays that undertake to frame questions about the effectiveness of religion-based interventions geared toward behavioral change and desistence from crime.

Dr. Lee Ross
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Rehabilitation
  • Restoration
  • Jail, Prison
  • Probation
  • Prison Ministry
  • Recovery
  • Re-Entry
  • Reintegration
  • Therapy
  • Imprisonment
  • Incarceration
  • Reformation

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Editorial
Prisoner Reformation and the Promise of Religion
Religions 2021, 12(2), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12020105 - 05 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1003
Abstract
Why do so many prisoners seek religious instruction and guidance while incarcerated [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Crime)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
Religiosity as a Mechanism to Control Delinquent Behaviour of School Students
Religions 2021, 12(10), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100823 - 01 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1412
Abstract
Delinquent behaviour among school students is a great concern of governments and educational institutions. Although the authorities and civil society organisations have tried to control the growing trend of school violence, antisocial behaviour among students is significantly increasing. The low delinquency rate among [...] Read more.
Delinquent behaviour among school students is a great concern of governments and educational institutions. Although the authorities and civil society organisations have tried to control the growing trend of school violence, antisocial behaviour among students is significantly increasing. The low delinquency rate among school students in Shah Alam, a city closed to the Malaysian capital, inspired the researchers to explore the association between religiosity and delinquent behaviour. The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between religiosity and the delinquent behaviour of school students. This research employed a mixed method to collect the data. An instrument consisting of 101 questions prepared based on the Muslim Religiosity–Personality Inventory (MRPI) was administrated to measure the level of religiosity. A total of 107 secondary school students (58 boys, 49 girls) aged 13 to 14 years participated in the data collection. A semi-structured interview was used to collect the data from four school counsellors and discipline teachers to examine the relationship between religiosity and delinquency. This research found a moderate level of religiosity among students in Shah Alam while having an inverse relationship between religiosity and delinquency. The researchers, therefore, recommend religiosity as a successful mechanism to control delinquency among school students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Crime)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
How Buddhism Plays a Role through Victim-Offender Mediation in Handling the Challenges of Crime in China’s Tibet
by
Religions 2021, 12(9), 699; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12090699 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1243
Abstract
Religion plays a significant role in the way Western societies respond to criminal offenses. However, the research on how religion plays a role in handling the challenges of crime in non-Western countries is lacking. In this study I try to close this research [...] Read more.
Religion plays a significant role in the way Western societies respond to criminal offenses. However, the research on how religion plays a role in handling the challenges of crime in non-Western countries is lacking. In this study I try to close this research gap by analyzing the victim-offender mediation in China’s Tibet, where influenced by religion, history and culture, a set of local solutions to control criminal offenses have traditionally been formed. Based on the field survey and second-hand information, I discuss how religious factors play a role in local victim-offender mediation in terms of the basis for mediation, mediator, mediation tactics, and guarantee for mediation agreement. While Buddhism acts as a form of self-control over the adherents of Buddhism, it works as a form of social control as well. Buddhist lama as the main mediator strategically uses Buddhist principles as mediation tactics in victim-offender mediation. After the mediation agreement is reached, religious ceremony is usually conducted as a guarantee. In conclusion I summarize the possible contribution of the research findings to the basic issues of restorative justice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Crime)
Back to TopTop