Special Issue "Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Sohail H. Hashmi

Professor of International Relations on the Alumnae Foundation and Professor of Politics, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College Street, South Hadley, Massachusetts 01075, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: comparative ethics, just war, jihad, Islamic political theory, Middle East politics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, Islamic ethics has expanded considerably as a field, as Muslims confront a host of new issues in, for example, medical ethics, environmental ethics, and human rights. Muslim ethical debates parallel those in other religious and philosophical traditions and are often driven or at least inspired by ethical debates in other parts of our ever-shrinking world. The focus of this special issue is on the connections between Muslim and non-Muslim ethical debates on key international concerns. How are Muslim ethical debates being influenced by external discourses? How is Islamic ethics contributing to these international discourses?

The issue will include at least two papers on each of the following topics, for a total of ten papers.

A. Medical ethics
B. Animal rights
C. Human rights (including migration and distributive justice)
D. Military ethics
E. Environmental ethics

Papers accepted for publication will cohere by following a common structure, outlined below. Each author will be asked to build their essay around a particularly important or decisive recent case. They will use the case study to illuminate the interconnections and mutual influences of Muslim and international discourses.

A. Background: ethical issues in Muslim and non-Muslim discourses pertinent to topic
B. Case study: facts
C. Case study: ethical analysis
D. Conclusion: what does case study show about influence of international discourses on Muslim debates and Muslim debates on international discourses?

Suggested length: 3,750-5,000 words

Prof. Sohail H. Hashmi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Islamic/Muslim ethics
  • medical ethics
  • animal rights
  • human rights
  • military ethics
  • environmental ethics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Rationality and Ethics between Western and Islamic Tradition
Religions 2018, 9(10), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9100302
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 6 October 2018 / Published: 7 October 2018
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Abstract
In the contemporary legal and political debate a large space is taken by the concept of ‘reasonableness’ as a multifaceted notion. Its plasticity makes it very adaptable to the variety of problems that is called on to solve. Its philosophical underpinnings are located
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In the contemporary legal and political debate a large space is taken by the concept of ‘reasonableness’ as a multifaceted notion. Its plasticity makes it very adaptable to the variety of problems that is called on to solve. Its philosophical underpinnings are located in the tradition of Western thought. On the one hand, we have the modern tradition, including the Kantian and the Humean views and, on the other, the Aristotelian–Thomistic tradition, proposing a different and competing conception of reasonableness. Insofar as the latter tradition proposes an idea relying on perfectionist considerations, I want to inquire into the Islamic tradition of reason and rationality in order to find whether it is closer to the first or to the second model. Concepts such as ‘ijitihad’, ‘maqasid’ and ‘maslaha’, I shall argue, find their better explanation if interpreted along the Aristotelian perfectionist tradition rather than along its competitor. If this move is well-founded, some important consequences for the understanding of contemporary Islamic culture may derive. My basic assumption is that those Islamic concepts (and a few others) embed a religious and cultural core of tension to ‘human development’ that can nicely dovetail with Aristotelian rationality and ethics of virtues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina)
Open AccessArticle Animal Ethics in Islam: A Review Article
Religions 2018, 9(9), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9090269
Received: 19 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
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Abstract
This article offers an assessment of the current state of scholarship on animal ethics in Islam. It first discusses a group of texts that share the preoccupation of demonstrating the superiority of Islam’s animal teachings, thus exhibiting a clearly apologetic tone. Then it
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This article offers an assessment of the current state of scholarship on animal ethics in Islam. It first discusses a group of texts that share the preoccupation of demonstrating the superiority of Islam’s animal teachings, thus exhibiting a clearly apologetic tone. Then it turns to the debate on animal ethics in Western academia. By raising challenging questions, the latter holds the promise of delving deeper into the subject, but at its current stage much of it is still hampered by factual inaccuracies and methodological flaws. In conclusion, the article explains why the subject of animal ethics in Islam is particularly deserving of careful study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina)
Open AccessArticle Islam in the Syrian War: Spotting the Various Dimensions of Religion in Conflict
Religions 2018, 9(8), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9080236
Received: 6 July 2018 / Revised: 30 July 2018 / Accepted: 1 August 2018 / Published: 3 August 2018
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Abstract
Religion has been a determining factor in the recent Syrian war since its beginnings, as a prominent identity marker as well as a motivational aspect on the path of jihad. This paper seeks to contribute to a more thorough understanding of the conflict
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Religion has been a determining factor in the recent Syrian war since its beginnings, as a prominent identity marker as well as a motivational aspect on the path of jihad. This paper seeks to contribute to a more thorough understanding of the conflict dynamics in Syria by adequately describing the role of religion in the war. Its comprehensive approach takes into account various ontological manifestations of religion: as an identity, a discourse, in its doctrinal aspect as a set of teachings, and in its significance for the individual believer. In doing so, the paper will focus on Sunni Islam as the focal point of the most crucial intersections of religion and conflict in Syria. Finally, religion will be described as a resource for reconciliation in Syria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina)
Open AccessArticle Intercultural Struggle and the Targeting of Noncombatants: The Case of the Islamic State
Religions 2018, 9(8), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9080230
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 27 July 2018
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Abstract
The prohibition against targeting noncombatants is a long-held commitment in both Muslim and Western military ethics. Nevertheless, some militant Muslim groups, and particularly the Islamic State, have created ever-widening space for attacking those traditionally considered immune from targeting in military operations. Our essay
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The prohibition against targeting noncombatants is a long-held commitment in both Muslim and Western military ethics. Nevertheless, some militant Muslim groups, and particularly the Islamic State, have created ever-widening space for attacking those traditionally considered immune from targeting in military operations. Our essay uses two theoretical apparatuses developed in social psychology—cultural cognition and moral foundations theory—to explain how certain aspects of post-9/11 tactics on the part of the United States and its allies have contributed to this phenomenon. We also use these same tools to show that similar dynamics work to contribute to the rightwing backlash against Muslims in the United States. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina)
Open AccessArticle Illicit Money in Contemporary Islamic Ethics
Religions 2018, 9(8), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9080226
Received: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
This paper discusses the question of the acquisition and the use of illicit money, māl ḥarām from the perspective of Islamic ethics. It first addresses five fatwas by Markaz al-fatwā on different cases of illicit money. Subsequently, the paper engages in an ethical
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This paper discusses the question of the acquisition and the use of illicit money, māl ḥarām from the perspective of Islamic ethics. It first addresses five fatwas by Markaz al-fatwā on different cases of illicit money. Subsequently, the paper engages in an ethical analysis of the responses and the arguments that Markaz al-fatwā provides to justify certain positions on the issue of illicit money. The discussion ends with an investigation of the difficulties of legalistic Islamic ethics in adapting to the Western contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muslim Ethics in the Global Medina)
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