Special Issue "Advances in the Psychology of Eastern Religions"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Health/Psychology/Social Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jonathan E. Ramsay
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
James Cook University, 149 Sims Dr, Singapore 387380, Singapore
Interests: religious prejudice; religious meaning-making; psychology of Eastern religions; atheism and unbelief; religion and well-being

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The past decade has seen a significant increase in cultural diversity within the psychology of religion. This diversity manifests in the examination of non-Christian religions and their adherents, as well as in scholarly contributions from researchers based outside of the traditional strongholds of North America and Europe. Given the serious concerns regarding cultural bias in the psychology of religion literature, these are positive developments for the field, especially when combining trends towards cross-cultural work and multi-lab collaborations.

Despite these advances, the psychology of Eastern religions is still relatively underdeveloped. A PsycINFO search for journal articles examining Christians and Christianity yields nearly 70,000 results. Similar searches for Buddhism, Hinduism, and Daoism yield less than 10,000 results each. It is clear that a profound imbalance remains in spite of efforts to make psychological science less “WEIRD”: Western, Educated, Industrialised, Rich, and Democratic.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to showcase recent advances in the psychology of Buddhism, Hinduism, Daoism, and other Eastern religious and spiritual traditions. The scope of contribution is broad: research examining the psychological and behavioural consequences of Eastern religious belief and affiliation is welcome, as contributions examining the inter-religious replicability of key findings derived from Western Christian populations. Contributions from research psychologists working in East, South, and Southeast Asia are particularly welcome.

Dr. Jonathan E. Ramsay
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychology of religion
  • Buddhism
  • Hinduism
  • Daoism
  • Eastern religions
  • spirituality
  • cross-cultural psychology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Supernatural Priming on Cheating Behaviour
Religions 2020, 11(6), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11060315 - 26 Jun 2020
Viewed by 875
Abstract
Research has shown that the mental activation of concepts related to supernatural agents (e.g., God, ghost) is capable of altering one’s moral behaviours. Based on the supernatural monitoring hypothesis, two experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of priming on cheating behaviour using [...] Read more.
Research has shown that the mental activation of concepts related to supernatural agents (e.g., God, ghost) is capable of altering one’s moral behaviours. Based on the supernatural monitoring hypothesis, two experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of priming on cheating behaviour using undergraduate participants from Singapore. The results of the first experiment showed that participants who were primed with the concepts of God and ghost via a word-scramble task cheated less in a mathematical task than participants exposed to neutral primes. The second experiment showed that the activation of God and ghost concepts via a supraliminal priming method reduced the participants’ cheating in a riddle game, even when the participants were informed that they would be rewarded monetarily for correctly answering the riddles. The results suggested that the mental activation of supernatural agents could reduce cheating behaviour regardless of the presence or absence of explicit belief in supernatural agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Psychology of Eastern Religions)
Article
Religious Identity and Public Pro-Environmental Behavior in China: The Mediating Role of Environmental Risk Perception
Religions 2020, 11(4), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11040165 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Although the positive relationship between religion and environmental behavior has aroused heated debate, empirical research on the relationship between religion and public pro-environmental behavior is still relatively insufficient. This paper aims to explore the group differences in the influence of religious identity on [...] Read more.
Although the positive relationship between religion and environmental behavior has aroused heated debate, empirical research on the relationship between religion and public pro-environmental behavior is still relatively insufficient. This paper aims to explore the group differences in the influence of religious identity on public pro-environmental behavior and the mediating role of environmental risk perception in religious identity and public pro-environmental behavior. Using the Chinese General Social Survey data of 2013 for empirical analysis, this study’s results show that there are group differences in the impact of religious identity on public pro-environmental behavior. Women with a religious identity are more willing to engage in public pro-environmental behavior than those without a religious identity. Additionally, people over the age of 45 with a religious identity are more willing to participate in public pro-environmental behavior than those without a religious identity. Furthermore, political participants with a religious identity are more willing to practice public pro-environmental behavior than those without a religious identity. In addition, we found that environmental risk perception can act as partial mediation in religion and public pro-environmental behavior. In other words, religious identities are deeply embedded in local political and social culture. In order to correctly understand the relationship between religion and public pro-environmental behavior, it is necessary to consider religious identity in a specific cultural background. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Psychology of Eastern Religions)
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