Special Issue "Membranes for Energy, Optics, and Electronics"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Shinji Kanehashi
Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: membrane; separation; barrier; permeation; diffusion; sorption; heat and mass transfer; polymer hybrid; thin film composite; CO2 capture; natural gas sweetening; hydrogen purification; biomass; renewable resources; microplastics; biodegradable; semi-conducting polymer; thermoelectric conversion; super-critical CO2
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, the role of membranes has been of growing importance in various industrial fields such as energy, optical and electronical applications. Membranes are generally required to have further functionalities and improved performance for each application. Great efforts have been made recently in research on the development of membrane materials, their applications, and their commercialization all over the world. Recent works on these applications also concentrate on green sustainable aspects, such as low carbon, green processes, energy-saving, biodegradable property, etc., to mitigate recent global environmental problems (e.g., global warming, air/ocean pollution, depletion of fossil fuels). 

This Special Issue broadly focuses on membrane applications for energy, optics and electronics. Therefore, this issue is focused on the following keywords: semiconducting materials, batteries, fuel cells, thermoelectric materials, electronic/electric materials, optical materials, separation/purification materials, barrier materials, etc. The topics of interest include not only the synthesis of novel membrane materials, membrane characterization, membrane performance and their applications, but also theoretical works.

The Guest Editor invites you to submit your original research or critical review articles to this Special Issue on “Membranes for Energy, Optics and Electronics”.

Dr. Shinji Kanehashi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • semiconducting materials
  • batteries
  • fuel cells
  • thermoelectric materials
  • electronic/electric materials
  • optical materials
  • separation/purification materials
  • barrier materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Permeation Properties of Ions through Inorganic Silica-Based Membranes
Membranes 2020, 10(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10020027 - 08 Feb 2020
Abstract
The development of inorganic membranes has mainly found applicability in liquid separation technologies. However, only a few reports cite the permeation and separation of liquids through inorganic nanofiltration membranes compared with the more popular microfiltration membranes. Herein, we prepared silica membranes using 3,3,3-trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane [...] Read more.
The development of inorganic membranes has mainly found applicability in liquid separation technologies. However, only a few reports cite the permeation and separation of liquids through inorganic nanofiltration membranes compared with the more popular microfiltration membranes. Herein, we prepared silica membranes using 3,3,3-trifluoropropyltrimethoxysilane (TFPrTMOS) to investigate its liquid permeance performance using four different ion solutions (i.e., NaCl, Na2SO4, MgCl2, and MgSO4). The TFPrTMOS-derived membranes were deposited above a temperature of 175 °C, where the deposition behavior of TFPrTMOS was dependent on the organic functional groups decomposition temperature. The highest membrane rejection was from NaCl at 91.0% when deposited at 200 °C. For anions, the SO42− rejections were the greatest. It was also possible to separate monovalent and divalent anions, as the negatively charged groups on the membrane surfaces retained pore sizes >1.48 nm. Ions were also easily separated by molecular sieving below a pore size of 0.50 nm. For the TFPrTMOS-derived membrane deposited at 175 °C, glucose showed 67% rejection, which was higher than that achieved through the propyltrimethoxysilane membrane. We infer that charge exclusion might be due to the dissociation of hydroxyl groups resulting from decomposition of organic groups. Pore size and organic functional group decomposition were found to be important for ion permeation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Energy, Optics, and Electronics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Control of Sequential MTO Reactions through an MFI-Type Zeolite Membrane Contactor
Membranes 2020, 10(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10020026 - 07 Feb 2020
Abstract
A membrane for controlling methanol-to-olefin (MTO) reactions was developed, which featured an MFI-type zeolite membrane (Si/Al = 25) that was synthesized on a porous α-alumina substrate using a secondary growth method. Here, the H2/SF6 permeance ratios were between 150 and [...] Read more.
A membrane for controlling methanol-to-olefin (MTO) reactions was developed, which featured an MFI-type zeolite membrane (Si/Al = 25) that was synthesized on a porous α-alumina substrate using a secondary growth method. Here, the H2/SF6 permeance ratios were between 150 and 450. The methanol conversion rate was 70% with 38% ethylene selectivity and 28% propylene selectivity as determined using a cross-flow membrane contactor. In order to improve the olefin selectivity of the membrane, the MFI zeolite layer (Si/Al = ∞) was coated on an MFI-type zeolite membrane (Si/Al = 25). Using this two-layered membrane system, the olefin selectivity value increased to 85%; this was 19% higher than the value obtained during the single-layer membrane system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Energy, Optics, and Electronics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Performance of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Application: Perspective on Morphological Structure
Membranes 2020, 10(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10030034 - 25 Feb 2020
Abstract
Membrane morphology plays a great role in determining the performance of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), especially for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Membrane morphology can be divided into two types, which are dense and porous structures. Membrane fabrication methods have different configurations, [...] Read more.
Membrane morphology plays a great role in determining the performance of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), especially for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Membrane morphology can be divided into two types, which are dense and porous structures. Membrane fabrication methods have different configurations, including dense, thin and thick, layered, sandwiched and pore-filling membranes. All these types of membranes possess the same densely packed structural morphology, which limits the transportation of protons, even at a low methanol crossover. This paper summarizes our work on the development of PEMs with various structures and architecture that can affect the membrane’s performance, in terms of microstructures and morphologies, for potential applications in DMFCs. An understanding of the transport behavior of protons and methanol within the pores’ limits could give some perspective in the delivery of new porous electrolyte membranes for DMFC applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membranes for Energy, Optics, and Electronics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop