Special Issue "Application of Glycobiology in the Treatment of Diseases"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vitor H. Pomin

Department of BioMolecular Sciences, Pharmacognosy division, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 (662) 915-3114
Interests: biological chemistry, structural biology, glycobiology, NMR spectrocopy, sulfated glycans, glycosaminoglycans, marine medicinal glycomics, interactomics, glycosaminoglycan–protein interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Glycobiology is a branch of science aimed at understanding the structure and function of carbohydrates and/or glycosylated compounds. It was previously believed that carbohydrates were biomolecules mainly responsible for storing energy, like glycogen and starch in animals and plants, or to serve as structural components, like chitin on the exoskeleton of insects and mollusks, and cellulose on the cell walls of plants and algae. This limited conception has been considerably enlarged over the last decades as the number of glycans and glycoconjugate structures have been revealed and associated with their various functions in biology and with their potential uses in medicine. Today, a series of functional glycans and glycoconjugates are widely studied in many scientific laboratories around the world. The research not only concerns the structural variations of carbohydrates, but also the functional roles and/or the beneficial effects of these molecules in various human diseases, such as inflammation, coagulation, thrombosis, cancer, microbial infections and neuronal disorders. Examples of carbohydrates under intense investigation today are the N- or O-linked glycoproteins, glycolipids, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and marine glycans like chitosan and sulfated polysaccharides. The impact of glycobiology on medicine has grown so intensively lately that even certain academic courses such as medicine, pharmacy, biology, biochemistry and chemistry, are now incorporating glycobiology as a separate subject in their curricula. Besides this, new international research programs related to this science have been developed. Examples of these projects include glycomics, medicinal glycomics, glycosaminoglycanomics, glycoproteomics and others. In this Special Issue, research and review papers are presented to enlighten the discussion about the potential therapeutic applications of carbohydrates.

Prof. Dr. Vitor H. Pomin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • N-linked glycans
  • O-linked glycans
  • Glycolipids
  • Proteoglycans
  • Glycosaminoglycans
  • Chitosan
  • Sulfated fucans
  • Sulfated galactans

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Association of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products with Metabolic Syndrome in Young Mexican Adults
Medicines 2018, 5(4), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines5040128
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 27 November 2018 / Published: 1 December 2018
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Abstract
Background: Consumption of dietary advanced glycation end products is linked to metabolic syndrome. The objective was to describe the association between dietary advanced glycation end products intake and metabolic syndrome in young Mexican adults. Methods: The present was a cross-sectional study in 126 [...] Read more.
Background: Consumption of dietary advanced glycation end products is linked to metabolic syndrome. The objective was to describe the association between dietary advanced glycation end products intake and metabolic syndrome in young Mexican adults. Methods: The present was a cross-sectional study in 126 Mexican adults 18–35 years old evaluating metabolic syndrome through the harmonized criteria. Macronutrients and dietary advanced glycation end products intake were estimated through three 24-hour dietary recalls and food composition tables. Association between metabolic syndrome and high advanced glycation end products intake (≥10,000 kU/day) was evaluated through three logistic regression models adjusted by sex, age, family history of cardiometabolic diseases and energy intake. Results: Subjects with a higher advanced glycation end products intake were more likely to have impaired fasting glucose (OR: 4.91, 95% CI 1.29–18.60, p < 0.05) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.67, 95% CI 0.96–7.44, p = 0.059) than those participants with low consumption of these products after adjustment of sex, age, family history of cardiovascular disease and energy intake. Conclusions: High intake of dietary advanced glycation end products was significantly associated with impaired fasting glucose and marginally with metabolic syndrome in young Mexican adults regardless of sex, age, family history of cardiovascular disease and energy intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Glycobiology in the Treatment of Diseases)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Heparin Binding Proteins as Therapeutic Target: An Historical Account and Current Trends
Received: 16 June 2019 / Revised: 16 July 2019 / Accepted: 18 July 2019 / Published: 29 July 2019
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Abstract
The polyanionic nature and the ability to interact with proteins with different affinities are properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that determine their biological function. In designing drugs affecting the interaction of proteins with GAGs the challenge has been to generate agents with high [...] Read more.
The polyanionic nature and the ability to interact with proteins with different affinities are properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that determine their biological function. In designing drugs affecting the interaction of proteins with GAGs the challenge has been to generate agents with high binding specificity. The example to emulated has been a heparin-derived pentasaccharide that binds to antithrombin-III with high affinity. However, the portability of this model to other biological situations is questioned on several accounts. Because of their structural flexibility, oligosaccharides with different sulfation and uronic acid conformation can display the same binding proficiency to different proteins and produce comparable biological effects. This circumstance represents a formidable obstacle to the design of drugs based on the heparin scaffold. The conceptual framework discussed in this article is that through a direct intervention on the heparin-binding functionality of proteins is possible to achieve a high degree of action specificity. This objective is currently pursued through two strategies. The first makes use of small molecules for which in the text we provide examples from past and present literature concerning angiogenic factors and enzymes. The second approach entails the mutagenesis of the GAG-binding site of proteins as a means to generate a new class of biologics of therapeutic interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Glycobiology in the Treatment of Diseases)
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