Special Issue "Viral Hepatitis: Epidemiological Features and Prevention"

A special issue of Infectious Disease Reports (ISSN 2036-7449). This special issue belongs to the section "Viral Hepatites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. George Rachiotis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical Faculty, University of Thessaly, Larissa 41222, Greece
Interests: epidemiology; occupational medicine; social determinants of health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

COVID-19 is dominating global scientific interest today, but other diseases still remain a considerable public health threat at a global scale. The disease related to viral hepatitis is one of these, the burden of which is increasing. Five years ago, the Member States of the World Health Organization committed to eliminating viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030, with a particular focus on hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. However, global viral hepatitis elimination by 2030 seems highly unlikely now. It is for this reason that this Special Issue of Infectious Diseases Reports entitled “Viral Hepatitis: Epidemiological Features and Prevention” is being launched, and we are look forward to receiving your submissions. You are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of feature papers to our Editorial Office for evaluation.

Dr. George Rachiotis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infectious Disease Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Prevention
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis D
  • Hepatitis E
  • Occupational and environmental risk factors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Brief Report
Reported Barriers to Hepatitis C Treatment among Pregnant and Early-Parenting Mothers Undergoing Substance Use Disorder Treatment in One U.S. State
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2022, 14(1), 1-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr14010001 - 22 Dec 2021
Viewed by 462
Abstract
Nationwide, the prevalence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has risen in recent years. At least 90% of infected persons must be treated to achieve global elimination targets. The current study aimed to explore barriers to, and facilitators of, direct-acting antiviral (DAA) HCV [...] Read more.
Nationwide, the prevalence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) has risen in recent years. At least 90% of infected persons must be treated to achieve global elimination targets. The current study aimed to explore barriers to, and facilitators of, direct-acting antiviral (DAA) HCV treatment uptake amongst pregnant and early-parenting women undergoing comprehensive substance use treatment. Twenty participants with documented HCV antibody positivity were recruited from two substance use treatment centers in central Kentucky. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore knowledge about HCV, previous experiences, and intentions to seek care. Themes were extracted using an inductive analytical approach. Most participants were aware of the dangers posed by HCV infection. However, there was a high degree of misinformation about transmission mechanisms and treatment eligibility requirements. Low priority for HCV treatment also surfaced as a barrier to treatment uptake. Participants reported being unable to seek care due to time and resource limitations in the presence of a highly demanding treatment process. Findings from the current study suggest that more work is needed to eliminate residual barriers that limit access to HCV treatment among pregnant and early-parenting women in treatment for substance use disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Hepatitis: Epidemiological Features and Prevention)
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