Special Issue "The Impact of Biofilms on Cleaning, Disinfection of Surfaces and Reprocessing of Reusable Medical Devices"

A special issue of Hygiene (ISSN 2673-947X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2022 | Viewed by 1172

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Honghua Hu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Surgical Infection Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Human Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, Australia
Interests: biofilms; decontamination; disinfection; medical devices; infection control; chronic infection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Dayane de Melo Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Medicine, Health and Human Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
2. Faculty of Nursing, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil
Interests: biofilms; decontamination; sterilization; disinfection; medical devices
Prof. Dr. Stephanie Dancer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland, UK
Interests: hospital cleaning; antimicrobial management; hospital-acquired infection and MRSA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biofilms are an aggregation of microorganisms encased by extracellular polymeric substances adhered to surfaces, which protect them from detergent/disinfectant/sterilizing action. When formed on healthcare facility surfaces (dry-surface biofilm), and on reusable medical devices (build-up biofilm), this microbial consortium represents a great challenge for healthcare-associated infection control and prevention. Thus, evidence-based strategies and practices to prevent biofilm formation and the chemical fixation of existing biofilms, as well as to remove biofilms from environmental surfaces and reusable medical devices are required to minimize pathogen transmission and, therefore, to deliver safer care to the patients.

This Special Issue aims to address the improvement of cleaning, disinfection and sterilization at healthcare facilities by presenting evidence-based strategies and practices to prevent biofilm formation, chemical fixation, and to remove biofilms from environmental surfaces and reusable medical devices.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions that discuss, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • The identification of dry-surface and/or build-up biofilm;
  • Strategies/practices/technologies for the prevention of dry-surface and/or build-up biofilm formation;
  • Strategies/practices/technologies for the prevention of dry-surface and/or build-up biofilm chemical fixation;
  • Strategies/practices/technologies for removing dry-surface and/or build-up biofilm.

Dr. Honghua Hu
Dr. Dayane de Melo Costa
Prof. Dr. Stephanie Dancer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hygiene is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biofilms
  • decontamination
  • cleaning
  • disinfection
  • sterilization
  • medical devices
  • healthcare facility surfaces
  • infection control
  • healthcare associated infection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiations against Coronavirus, Bacteria, Fungi, Fungal Spores and Biofilm
Hygiene 2022, 2(3), 120-131; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2030010 - 12 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Ultra-violet (UV) C (200–280 wavelength) light has long been known for its antimicrobial and disinfecting efficacy. It damages DNA by causing the dimerization of pyrimidines. A newly designed technology (MUVi-UVC; Mobile UV Innovations Pty Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia) that emits UVC at 240 [...] Read more.
Ultra-violet (UV) C (200–280 wavelength) light has long been known for its antimicrobial and disinfecting efficacy. It damages DNA by causing the dimerization of pyrimidines. A newly designed technology (MUVi-UVC; Mobile UV Innovations Pty Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia) that emits UVC at 240 nm is composed of an enclosed booth with three UVC light stands each with four bulbs, and has been developed for disinfecting mobile medical equipment. The aim of this project was to examine the spectrum of antimicrobial activity of this device. The experiments were designed following ASTM E1052-20, EN14561, BSEN14476-2005, BSEN14562-2006 and AOAC-Official-Method-966.04 standards for surface disinfection after drying microbes on surfaces. The disinfection was analyzed using Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6294), Candida auris (CBS 12373), spores of Aspergillus niger (ATCC 16404), coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 surrogate ATCC VR-261) as well as a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SA31), a carbapenem- and polymyxin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA219), Escherichia coli K12 (ATCC 10798) and Salmonella typhi (ATCC 700730). The parameters of time, the number of lights and direction of the sample facing the lights were examined. The MUVi-UVC was able to kill 99.999% of all of the tested bacteria, fungi, coronavirus and bacteria in the biofilms if used for 5 min using all three lights in the setup with the glass slides in a vertical position. However, for fungal spores, 30 min were required to achieve 99.999% killing. There was a small but insignificant effect of having the surface horizontally or vertically aligned to the UV lights. Therefore, this UVC device is an effective technology to disinfect medical devices. Full article
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Review

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Review
Providing Sterile Orthopedic Implants: Challenges Associated with Multiple Reprocessing of Orthopedic Surgical Trays
Hygiene 2022, 2(1), 63-71; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene2010005 - 14 Mar 2022
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Abstract
Orthopedic implants, such as screws, are provided in a non-sterile state and must be reprocessed before each use, therefore they may be subjected to multiple reprocessing cycles until they are implanted in the patient. The effect of these various reprocessing cycles on the [...] Read more.
Orthopedic implants, such as screws, are provided in a non-sterile state and must be reprocessed before each use, therefore they may be subjected to multiple reprocessing cycles until they are implanted in the patient. The effect of these various reprocessing cycles on the quality and safety of these implants has been a subject of concern and discussion around the world. In this narrative review, we discuss the four main challenges associated with supplying these non-sterile implants to the same standard, with respect to their quality and safety, as implants that are provided sterile: microbiological contamination (focusing on biofilm), non-microbiological contamination, surface damage, and their acquisition in surgical trays from loaner companies. Full article
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