Ecosystem Disturbance in Small Streams

A special issue of Hydrobiology (ISSN 2673-9917).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2695

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Environmental Biology and Ecology, Department of Life Science, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763, Republic of Korea
Interests: plankton ecology; freshwater algal taxonomy; harmful algal bloom (HAB) biological control; cyanobacteria; biomanipulation; fish; mussels; bacteria; stream ecosystem health; diatom index; community dynamic index
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ecosystem disturbance of small streams adjacent to cities or residential environments is greatly influenced by artificial factors such as various dam constructions, road maintenance, and aggregate collection for the purpose of water resource use or flood prevention. The most serious problem is that in addition to breaking the continuity of streams and blocking ecological pathways, changes in stream productivity occur through food chains.

This Special Issue seeks to pursue ecosystem changes that occur in streams located in various spaces on the earth, as various ecosystem changes (disturbance, succession, energy flow) are expected in small rivers due to natural or artificial influences. In this regard, it is expected that experts on various taxa, such as water quality, microorganisms (viruses, bacteria), attached algae, benthic invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds, will participate.

Prof. Dr. Baik-Ho Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hydrobiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • small stream
  • disturbance
  • succession
  • corridor
  • river continuum
  • biofilm
  • current
  • viruses
  • bacteria
  • attached algae
  • benthic invertebrates
  • fish
  • amphibians
  • reptiles
  • mammals
  • birds

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 849 KiB  
Article
Effects of Species of Leaves and Conditioning Time on Vernal Colonization by Temperate Lotic Isopods (Lirceus sp.)
by Renee E. Heller, Alison N. Stouffer and Erika V. Iyengar
Hydrobiology 2024, 3(2), 63-73; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrobiology3020005 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 247
Abstract
While some streams have dense populations of aquatic detritivorous isopods, research on the colonization of leaf packs typically focuses on aquatic insects. To determine whether shifts in dominant local forest species might impact isopod populations, we placed leaf packs of red/sugar maple, American [...] Read more.
While some streams have dense populations of aquatic detritivorous isopods, research on the colonization of leaf packs typically focuses on aquatic insects. To determine whether shifts in dominant local forest species might impact isopod populations, we placed leaf packs of red/sugar maple, American beech, and red oak on the substratum of riffles and pools in Cedar Creek (Allentown, PA, USA) in April 2019. We retrieved the packs after one week, re-deployed them, and re-collected them after two weeks of submersion, enumerating the number of isopods (Lirceus sp.) upon each retrieval. Surprisingly, neither the species of leaf nor the stream microhabitat significantly affected the number of isopods. However, the duration of leaf conditioning was important; significantly more isopods inhabited leaves after two weeks of submersion than after only one week. Maple and oak leaves displayed significantly more skeletonization after two weeks than the beech leaves, which remained intact. However, the similar numbers of isopods across leaf species suggest either the presence of acceptable, consumable microbial communities on all three species of leaves or that a tradeoff exists between the value of food and the importance of refuge provided by intact leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecosystem Disturbance in Small Streams)
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12 pages, 1173 KiB  
Article
Population Status of the Tropical Freshwater Shrimp Xiphocaris elongata in Urban and Forest Streams in Puerto Rico
by Wesley X. Torres-Perez and Omar Perez-Reyes
Hydrobiology 2023, 2(1), 277-288; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrobiology2010018 - 17 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1728
Abstract
Most of the human population lives in cities, and understanding their impact on freshwater environments is essential. Streams in cities face many environmental challenges that have been described in the concept of Urban Stream Syndrome. This concept illustrates urban streams’ biological, hydrological, chemical, [...] Read more.
Most of the human population lives in cities, and understanding their impact on freshwater environments is essential. Streams in cities face many environmental challenges that have been described in the concept of Urban Stream Syndrome. This concept illustrates urban streams’ biological, hydrological, chemical, and physical stressors. In tropical streams, these stressors impact shrimp, fish, insects, and other macroinvertebrates that inhabit the freshwater ecosystems. Freshwater shrimp are vulnerable to urban activities, physical, chemical, and ecological impacts. For this reason, these organisms have been used as biological indicators of stream health in the tropics. The shredder shrimp Xiphocaris elongata plays a fundamental role in the organic matter process and decomposition. The objectives of this study were to characterize the population of X. elongata and to identify differences in the abundance of X. elongata between urban and forest streams. Our results showed that highly urbanized areas have a significantly lower abundance of the shredder shrimp X. elongata than medium or low urban reach in the urban and forested watersheds. This study also showed that physicochemical and geomorphological variables are important environmental factors that influence the abundance of X. elongata in Puerto Rican streams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecosystem Disturbance in Small Streams)
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