Special Issue "Protein Microarrays"

A special issue of High-Throughput (ISSN 2571-5135).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Xiaobo Yu

State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center National Center for Protein Sciences-Beijing (PHOENIX Center), Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, 102206, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: protein microarrays; proteomics; translational medicine; biomarker; protein/antibody profiling; high-throughput screening; protein function
Guest Editor
Prof. Joshua LaBaer

Executive Director (Interim), Biodesign Institute Director, Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics Virginia G. Piper Chair of Personalized Medicine Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University Adjunct Professor of Medicine - College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: disease biomarker discovery; protein microarrays; protein interaction mapping; systems biology; early disease detection; pathogen detection; immune responses; cancer biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rapid development of proteomics and translational medicine, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput studies on protein profiling, molecular function, drug screening, as well as finding biomarkers for the diagnostics and therapeutic treatment of a variety of human diseases.

In the last decade, protein microarrays have made significant inroads in their use in both basic and clinical research. With the state-of-the-art array technologies, thousands of proteins or antibodies can be displayed well on a microscopic surface using small amounts of sample. Proteome microarrays from different species have been produced, including human, bacterial pathogens, Arabidopsis and viruses, etc. Those protein microarrays have demonstrated the power of unbiased screening for the target of interest in different biological and clinical samples from proteomics scale, such as protein interactions, post-translational modifications, (auto) antibody biomarker and drug target identifications, etc. Already, the first proteomics-derived blood assay for early breast cancer detection, Videssa® Breast consisting of autoantibody and protein biomarkers, have been entered into the multi-center clinical validations (PMID: 20977275, PMID:27508384). Compared to high-density protein microarrays, bead-based arrays are good at quantifications with sandwich immunoassays and more frequently used in the validation of cancer biomarkers in a large cohort of clinical samples as well as in clinical diagnostics when the multiplexing is necessary, i.e., OVA1 test (ASPiRA LABSTM). This Special Issue of protein microarrays will be focus on the technologies and applications of protein microarrays from basic research to translational medicine. The manuscripts describing protein microarrays, antibody microarrays, reverse-phase protein arrays, peptide microarrays, lectin microarrays and bead-based arrays are welcome.

Prof. Xiaobo Yu
Prof. Joshua LaBaer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • protein microarrays
  • antibody microarrays
  • reverse-phase protein arrays
  • peptide microarrays
  • lectin microarrays
  • bead-based array
  • assay development
  • biomarker
  • protein function
  • High-throughput screening

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Development and Validation of an Ultrasensitive Procalcitonin Sandwich Immunoassay
High-Throughput 2017, 6(4), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/ht6040018
Received: 20 October 2017 / Revised: 8 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2033 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Procalcitonin (PCT) is well established as a highly specific biomarker for the detection of bacterial infections and sepsis. However, the currently available diagnostic tests are not able to detect very low or very early increases of PCT or even baseline levels in healthy [...] Read more.
Procalcitonin (PCT) is well established as a highly specific biomarker for the detection of bacterial infections and sepsis. However, the currently available diagnostic tests are not able to detect very low or very early increases of PCT or even baseline levels in healthy individuals or patients with non-bacterial infections. In order to be able to detect these very low concentrations of PCT, a sandwich immunoassay was developed using high sensitivity Single Molecule Array technology (Simoa). The assay was thoroughly validated and applied to analyze human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from patients with bacterial or viral meningitis as well as CSF, serum, and K2 EDTA plasma from healthy control subjects. A 50-fold increase in sensitivity compared to the current gold standard assays was achieved, which was sensitive enough for the detection of baseline PCT levels. Both serum and CSF showed significantly elevated PCT levels in patients with bacterial meningitis compared to patients with viral meningitis and the healthy control group. Procalcitonin concentration levels for patients with viral meningitis and the control group could be measured, but were not significantly different. The determination of PCT in the low pg·mL−1 range could help to improve the monitoring of bacterial infectious diseases, as PCT level changes could be detected earlier. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Microarrays)
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Open AccessArticle
Study of the Humoral Immune Response towards HCV Genotype 4 Using a Bead-Based Multiplex Serological Assay
High-Throughput 2017, 6(4), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/ht6040015
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 26 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1686 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hepatitis C is one of the leading causes of hepatocellular carcinoma and remains at a high prevalence in Egypt and other resource-limited countries. Several hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes are distributed throughout the world, with genotype 4 being most common in North and [...] Read more.
Hepatitis C is one of the leading causes of hepatocellular carcinoma and remains at a high prevalence in Egypt and other resource-limited countries. Several hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes are distributed throughout the world, with genotype 4 being most common in North and Central Africa. We developed a multiplex serological assay for the detection of the HCV specific humoral immune response, with a focus on genotype 4. For the multiplex HCV assay we used twelve antigenic regions of different HCV proteins (core, and non-structural (NS) proteins NS3, NS4, NS5A, NS5B) and validated the assay technically and clinically. In comparison to a commercially available test, our assay revealed a higher sensitivity for genotype 4, and is therefore more suited for studying immune seroconversion in samples from acutely infected Egyptian HCV patients. Furthermore, our assay discriminates acutely and chronically infected HCV patients. Of 296 well characterized HCV patient samples, 83.9% of the acute samples and 86.5% of the chronic samples could be correctly classified. In sum, this newly developed serological HCV assay has a higher sensitivity for HCV genotype 4, and can thus improve diagnostic accuracy. Through the discrimination of acutely and chronically infected HCV patients the assay may be useful in supporting clinical management of HCV patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Microarrays)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of a Bead-Based Multiplex Assay for the Analysis of the Serological Response against the Six Pathogens HAV, HBV, HCV, CMV, T. gondii, and H. pylori
High-Throughput 2017, 6(4), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/ht6040014
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 17 October 2017 / Accepted: 26 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
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Abstract
The spread of infectious diseases and vaccination history are common subjects of epidemiological and immunological research studies. Multiplexed serological assays are useful tools for assessing both current and previous infections as well as vaccination efficacy. We developed a serological multi-pathogen assay for hepatitis [...] Read more.
The spread of infectious diseases and vaccination history are common subjects of epidemiological and immunological research studies. Multiplexed serological assays are useful tools for assessing both current and previous infections as well as vaccination efficacy. We developed a serological multi-pathogen assay for hepatitis A, B and C virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Toxoplasma gondii, and Helicobacter pylori using a bead-based multiplex assay format. The multi-pathogen assay consisting of 15 antigens was utilized for the analysis of the serological response in elderly individuals of an influenza vaccination study (n = 34). The technical assay validation revealed a mean intra-assay precision of coefficient of variation (CV) = 3.2 ± 1.5% and a mean inter-assay precision of CV = 8.2 ± 5.3% across all 15 antigens and all tested samples, indicating a robust test system. Furthermore, the assay shows high sensitivities (ranging between 94% and 100%) and specificities (ranging between 93% and 100%) for the different pathogens. The highest seroprevalence rates in our cohort were observed for hepatitis A virus (HAV; 73.5%), followed by CMV (70.6%), T. gondii (67.6%) and H. pylori (32.4%). Seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus (HBV, 8.8%) and hepatitis C virus (HCV, 0%) were low. The seroprevalences observed in our study were similar to those from other population-based studies in Germany. In summary, we conclude that our multiplex serological assay represents a suitable tool for epidemiological studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Microarrays)
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