Special Issue "Sediment Transport and Soil Erosion—Modelling, Monitoring and Experimental Methods"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Monica Papini

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: field geology; geological mapping; basin analysis; engineering geology; geomorphological mapping; rocks; fluvial geomorphology; landslides; natural hazards
Guest Editor
Prof. Laura Longoni

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Field Geology; Geological Mapping; Basin Analysis; Engineering Geology; Geomorphological Mapping; Rocks; Fluvial Geomorphology; Landslides; Natural Hazards
Guest Editor
Dr. Vladislav Ivov Ivanov

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: field geology; geological mapping; basin analysis; engineering geology; geomorphological mapping; rocks; fluvial geomorphology; landslides; natural hazards

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research into soil erosion and sediment transport merits a broad echo within the scienfitic community due to the number of implications in terms of various environemntal processes and the consequent societal challenges. Channel stability, dam siltation, river-structure interactions, agriculture, urban planning, and flood risk generation are among the fields that are directly linked to the effects of soil erosion and sediment transport. Thus, this Special Issue aims to encompass the vast recent research devoted to those phenomena. Works on modelling, monitoring as well as experimental applications will be welcomed. Research into the development of innovative technologies and their application will be appreciated as we strive for excellence in the state-of-the art. Moreover, manuscripts on the integration of different techniques, in terms of modelling, monitoring and experimental work, are going to be incentivized, since it is our belief that a combination of multidisciplinary practices is crucial for the analysis and harmonization of these multifaceted phenomena. We consider that the submitted works will provide an extensive overview of the current research progress on these topics, as well as any closely related matter.

Prof. Monica Papini
Prof. Laura Longoni
Dr. Vladislav Ivov Ivanov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil erosion
  • Sediment transport
  • Hydrographic basins
  • Geomorphology
  • Experimental methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Numerical Investigation on Tidally Induced Sediment Transport and Morphological Changes with Changing Sea Level in South-East England
Geosciences 2019, 9(3), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9030140
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 4 March 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
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Abstract
The impact of tide-induced morphological changes and water level variations on the sediment transport in a tidally dominated system has been investigated using the numerical model Delft3D and South-East England as a test case. The goal of this manuscript is to explore the [...] Read more.
The impact of tide-induced morphological changes and water level variations on the sediment transport in a tidally dominated system has been investigated using the numerical model Delft3D and South-East England as a test case. The goal of this manuscript is to explore the long-term changes in morphology due to sea level rise and the large-scale morphodynamic equilibrium of the South-East England. Our results suggest that the long term (century scale) tidally-induced morphological evolution of the seabed slows down in time and promotes a vanishing net transport across the large scale system. Century-scale morphologically updated simulations show that both morphological changes and net transport values tend to decrease in time as the system attains a dynamic equilibrium configuration. Results further suggest that the presence of a gradual increase in mean sea level accelerates the initial morphological evolution of the system whose morphological rate of change gradually attains, however, same plateau values as in the absence of sea level rise. Given the same base morphology, increasing water levels enhance residual currents and the net transport near the coastline; and vice-versa, decreasing sea levels minimize both residuals and net transport near the coastline. The areas that are more affected by, water level and morphological changes, are the ones where the net transport is the highest. This manuscript explores and allows extending the idea of morphodynamic equilibrium at a regional scale, larger than the one for which this concept has been generally explored i.e., estuarine scale. Full article
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