Special Issue "Labor and Development"

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 3 March 2020

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Corrado Andini

Department of Management and Economics, University of Madeira, Campus da Penteada, 9000-390 Funchal, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Labor Economics; Macroeconomics; Industrial Organization

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

As is well known, investigating the path from cause to effect in economics and other social sciences is rather difficult as Randomized Control Trials (RCTs), i.e. experiments in which the units of analysis are randomly assigned to treatment and control groups, are rare. Nevertheless, an expanding body of empirical research incorporates studies in which the units of analysis are assigned to treatment and control groups "as if" random assignment had taken place. These studies are usually called quasi-experiments and implement causal inference methods such as Instrumental Variables (IV), Regression Discontinuity Design (RDD), and Difference-in-Differences (DiD). We invite researchers to submit original papers performing IV, RDD or DiD estimation to study the causal effects of labor inputs on development outcomes, where both "labor" and "development" are interpreted in broad sense. All submissions for the special issue on "Labor and Development" must contain original unpublished work not being considered for publication elsewhere. Both regular papers and short notes are welcome. Survey articles discussing quasi-experimental studies on the links between labor activities and economic development are also of interest.

Prof. Dr. Corrado Andini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Economies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Please refer to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/economies/apc for Article Processing Charge (APC). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Instrumental Variables
  • Regression Discontinuity Design
  • Difference-in-Differences
  • Labor Markets
  • Economic Development

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Source Country Economic Development and Dynamics of the Skill Composition of Emigration
Received: 9 January 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 11 March 2019
PDF Full-text (1725 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents an endogenous growth model of migration and technological diffusion with transitional dynamics, which provide explanations for the empirical pattern of the mobility transition. A two-skill group extension of this model offers new hypotheses regarding the skill composition of emigration during [...] Read more.
This paper presents an endogenous growth model of migration and technological diffusion with transitional dynamics, which provide explanations for the empirical pattern of the mobility transition. A two-skill group extension of this model offers new hypotheses regarding the skill composition of emigration during the mobility transition. Skill-biased technological change (SBTC), which first occurs in the destination, raises the relative return to high skill migration and thus the high-to-low skill emigration ratio. As SBTC eventually diffuses to the source economy, it also raises the relative return to high skill investment there, and causes a decline in the high-to-low skill emigration ratio. Empirical evidence using bilateral migration data from 31 destinations and 195 origins is shown to support this hypothesis, with the average income of origins, at which the peak high-to-low skill emigration ratio is reached, is estimated at $2000 in 2011 US dollars PPP (adjusted for purchasing power parity). Furthermore, research and development intensity as a measure of SBTC in destinations is shown to be empirically, positively linked to the bilateral high-to-low skill emigration ratio. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Labor and Development)
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