Precision Medicine: Update and Priorities

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721). This special issue belongs to the section "Cardiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 7482

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cardiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, Tayside, DD1 9SY, UK
Interests: cardiovascular therapeutics; translational medicine; heart failure; cardio-metabolic disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UKM Medical Molecular Biology Institute (UMBI), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaacob Latif, Bandar Tun Razak, Cheras, 56000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Interests: cancers; diabetes; sudden cardiac death; rare diseases; hypercholesterolemia; cohort studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Precision medicine has and continues to drive drug development and biomarker discovery for many diseases. Driven by a better understanding of the human genome, precision medicine has the potential to allow a better understanding of the causes and manifestations of diseases with the potential to identify biomarkers that could identify at risk patients. More recently, there has been much interest in the analysis of large population datasets to find personalized needs for more effective and safe treatment. These large population datasets will likely need artificial intelligence to help analyse these very large datasets. This Special Issue is within the section of Cardiology within Diseases and we wish to invite contributions in the field of cardio-metabolic diseases alongside all diseases, as we believe the prime moment has arrived, if new research is any indication.

Prof. Dr. Chim Lang
Prof. Dr. Rahman Jamal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • precision medicine
  • genomics
  • non-communicable diseases
  • therapeutics
  • diagnostics
  • biomarkers
  • artificial intelligence
  • drug safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

12 pages, 800 KiB  
Review
Cardiotoxicity and Chemotherapy—The Role of Precision Medicine
by Thyla Viswanathan, Chim C. Lang, Russell D. Petty and Mark A. Baxter
Diseases 2021, 9(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9040090 - 08 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3341
Abstract
Cancer and cardiovascular disease are the leading causes of death in the United Kingdom. Many systemic anticancer treatments are associated with short- and long-term cardiotoxicity. With improving cancer survival and an ageing population, identifying those patients at the greatest risk of cardiotoxicity from [...] Read more.
Cancer and cardiovascular disease are the leading causes of death in the United Kingdom. Many systemic anticancer treatments are associated with short- and long-term cardiotoxicity. With improving cancer survival and an ageing population, identifying those patients at the greatest risk of cardiotoxicity from their cancer treatment is becoming a research priority and has led to a new subspecialty: cardio-oncology. In this concise review article, we discuss cardiotoxicity and systemic anticancer therapy, with a focus on chemotherapy. We also discuss the challenge of identifying those at risk and the role of precision medicine as we strive for a personalised approach to this clinical scenario. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Precision Medicine: Update and Priorities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 750 KiB  
Review
Precision Medicine and Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Cardiovascular Drugs
by James D. Noyes, Ify R. Mordi, Alexander S. Doney, Rahman Jamal and Chim C. Lang
Diseases 2021, 9(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9030055 - 12 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3250
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading global cause of death. Early intervention, with lifestyle advice alongside appropriate medical therapies, is fundamental to reduce patient mortality among high-risk individuals. For those who live with the daily challenges of cardiovascular disease, pharmacological management aims to relieve [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading global cause of death. Early intervention, with lifestyle advice alongside appropriate medical therapies, is fundamental to reduce patient mortality among high-risk individuals. For those who live with the daily challenges of cardiovascular disease, pharmacological management aims to relieve symptoms and prevent disease progression. Despite best efforts, prescription drugs are not without their adverse effects, which can cause significant patient morbidity and consequential economic burden for healthcare systems. Patients with cardiovascular diseases are often among the most vulnerable to adverse drug reactions due to multiple co-morbidities and advanced age. Examining a patient’s genome to assess for variants that may alter drug efficacy and susceptibility to adverse reactions underpins pharmacogenomics. This strategy is increasingly being implemented in clinical cardiology to tailor patient therapies. The identification of specific variants associated with adverse drug effects aims to predict those at greatest risk of harm, allowing alternative therapies to be given. This review will explore current guidance available for pharmacogenomic-based prescribing as well as exploring the potential implementation of genetic risk scores to tailor treatment. The benefits of large databases and electronic health records will be discussed to help facilitate the integration of pharmacogenomics into primary care, the heartland of prescribing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Precision Medicine: Update and Priorities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop