COVID-19 Pandemic: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Adaptation to Climate Change

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 9263

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Professor, Department of Human Sciences, Khemis-Miliana University, Khemis-Miliana 44225, Algeria
Interests: sustainable transport policies; adaptation to climate change in land transport; adaptation of cities to climate change; transport and town planning relationship; mobility; fight against traffic accidents; health geography; smart and green cities; pedestrian and bicycle mobility; new forms of governance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Public Health and Environment, College of Health Sciences, Abu Dhabi University, Abu Dhabi 59911, United Arab Emirates
Interests: radiation protection; occupational safety and health; environmental radiation; legal Requirements; laws and regulations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many forms of weather phenomena such as floods, large waves, prolonged droughts and extreme temperatures are having an impact on human life. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the actions we should take to adapt to these situations and reduce the influences caused by them are very critical. Based on the current situation, many countries around the world are trying to engage with strategies, actions and reflections to reduce impacts on the urban environment and to identify the best actions to improve urban resilience and civilian well-being. However, the situation is not the same in all countries, forcing some to step up their interventions and learn from the actions taken by others.

This Special Issue aims to identify the best new forms and measures of adaptation to climate change in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. All aspects of related actions and policies are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Azzeddine Madani
Dr. Rahaf Ajaj
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • urban design of cities and public infrastructure
  • urban agriculture, shared gardens in cities
  • urban greening
  • mobility and new forms of travel
  • telecommuting and new forms of work
  • communication, awareness and early warning systems
  • urban risk management
  • international experience of adaptation to climate change during and after the COVID-19 pandemic
  • adaptation policy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 771 KiB  
Article
Perception and Knowledge of Algerian Students about Climate Change and Its Putative Relationship with the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Preliminary Cross-Sectional Survey
by Mohamed Lounis, Azzeddine Madani and Saad Eddine Boutebal
Climate 2023, 11(4), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11040090 - 19 Apr 2023
Viewed by 2230
Abstract
Background: Climate changes (CC) is one of the most important insidious crises affecting all countries in the world in the 21st century, including Algeria, and it is projected to affect many people in the future. Mitigation of the effects of this phenomenon will [...] Read more.
Background: Climate changes (CC) is one of the most important insidious crises affecting all countries in the world in the 21st century, including Algeria, and it is projected to affect many people in the future. Mitigation of the effects of this phenomenon will certainly involve environmental education, especially among university students. Therefore, evaluating their level of knowledge could help us understand to what extent they are prepared to contribute in the global efforts to fight against this catastrophe. Objective: The current study aims to investigate the perception and knowledge of Algerian students about climate change and its potential relationship with the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted on a sample of 204 Algerian students by adopting snowball sampling during the academic year (2022/2023), with a questionnaire based on Google Forms. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The results obtained showed that 95.6% of the students asked had heard about this phenomenon and more than 90% perceived that it was really happening. The level of knowledge is significantly associated with age, where students aged between 20 and 30 years old had a lower level of knowledge than those over 30 years old (OR = 0.22, p = 0.027). Furthermore, students of the Humanities have shown the lowest level of knowledge compared to those of other domains. Regarding their attitude, only 31.8% of the asked students declared that they changed their attitude positively during the COVID-19 pandemic. The change in attitude and concern is statistically associated neither with the level of knowledge and perception nor COVID-19 affection, psychological impact, and uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. Conclusion: The study concluded that there was a high level of awareness and a medium level of knowledge about CC among Algerian university students. However, most of them were either very worried or a little worried about this phenomenon. It was also suggested that the average level of knowledge about cause and effect and pandemic resistance could be attributed to the scientific study path of students from the study sample. The results of this study could be used as a baseline for future research into CC knowledge and perception in Algeria. Full article
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17 pages, 350 KiB  
Article
Political and Social Drivers of COVID-19 Prevention and Climate Change Behaviors and Attitudes
by Carl A. Latkin, Zoé Mistrale Hendrickson, Lauren Dayton and Haley Bonneau
Climate 2023, 11(3), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11030053 - 26 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3295
Abstract
Attitudes and behaviors related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate change crisis might be driven by similar political beliefs and attitudes. The current study used a neo-Gramsci perspective to examine how political attitudes may be linked to COVID-19 prevention and climate change [...] Read more.
Attitudes and behaviors related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate change crisis might be driven by similar political beliefs and attitudes. The current study used a neo-Gramsci perspective to examine how political attitudes may be linked to COVID-19 prevention and climate change attitudes and behaviors. A longitudinal online survey in the US assessed climate change and COVID-19 attitudes and behaviors, and wave 7 (2021) data were used to predict outcomes at wave 8 (2022) among 572 respondents. There were significant correlations among the variables of political ideology, climate change concerns, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, COVID-19 skepticism, COVID-19 vaccine as a personal choice, COVID-19 conspiracy, political correctness, percent of Republican friends, and dislike of the Democratic Party. In the multivariate models, COVID-19 vaccination as a personal choice was significantly associated with the four outcomes: vaccination status, climate change actions, vaccine hesitancy, and climate change concerns. COVID-19 skepticism was significantly associated with vaccination status, vaccine hesitancy, and climate change concerns. These findings suggest that there are similar drivers of COVID-19 prevention and climate change attitudes and behaviors, and interventions need to be tailored to target individual-level and societal-level factors. Full article
16 pages, 2022 KiB  
Article
Flames and Viruses: Australian and Hungarian Media Representation of the Australian Bushfires and the COVID-19 Pandemic, A Case Study
by Priszcilla Hafenscher and Ferenc Jankó
Climate 2022, 10(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10110163 - 27 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1836
Abstract
This study addresses the difference in media coverage of the Australian bushfires and the pandemic, using an Australian and a Hungarian news site. After a frame analysis of text and imagery, a narration analysis was conducted. Our results provided evidence that crises were [...] Read more.
This study addresses the difference in media coverage of the Australian bushfires and the pandemic, using an Australian and a Hungarian news site. After a frame analysis of text and imagery, a narration analysis was conducted. Our results provided evidence that crises were covered in different ways. For a distant news portal, it was an obvious option to use the bushfires in order to visualize climate change. In contrast, the bushfire–climate link has been a politicized subject in Australia for decades; hence, the exceptional bushfire season was also unable to get the issue on the agenda. Although the Australian news media in our sample strived to portray a crisis under control, when compared to the pandemic, it was not so effective. Therefore, localization is a major challenge for effective climate communication, where lessons from the pandemic, using more economic and social frames, could be helpful. Full article
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