Ideas, Practices and Strategies for the Implementation of Sustainable Architecture, including User Needs, Construction Technology, and Resource Efficiency

A special issue of Architecture (ISSN 2673-8945).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 9354

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Architecture, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2K6, Canada
Interests: factors which influence the design and implementation; affordable and sustainable building practices at the unit and community levels; market acceptance, construction, and resource efficiency
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past half century, buildings in many nations have been built with no regard for nature while exhausting natural resources both during construction and after occupancy. A much-talked-about term that casts a framework for new design thinking is sustainability. The fundamental thrust of this idea is thought processes and practices about the future consequences of present development actions.

This Special Issue looks for papers that address urban planning and the design of buildings with smaller environmental footprints and efficient resource consumption. In particular, the Guest Editor is looking for papers with attention given to higher density areas. The Issue will also welcome papers on technology-oriented subjects such as active and passive heating and cooling systems, healthy indoor environments, energy-efficient windows, net-zero buildings, sustainable building materials selection, water recycling and efficiency, waste management and disposal, xeriscaping, edible landscapes and green roofs.

Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments and applications.

Thank you very much.

Prof. Dr. Avi Friedman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Architecture is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active and passive heating and cooling systems
  • healthy indoor environments
  • energy-efficient windows
  • net-zero buildings
  • sustainable building materials selection
  • water recycling and efficiency
  • waste management and disposal
  • xeriscaping
  • edible landscapes and green roofs

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2613 KiB  
Article
Assessing the COVID-19 Impact of Projects under Construction with Monte Carlo Simulation
by Yih-Tzoo Chen, Yee-Yen Yang and Yi-Hua Chen
Architecture 2023, 3(2), 175-194; https://doi.org/10.3390/architecture3020011 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2105
Abstract
The outbreak of the novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) in 2019 and the 2022 war in Ukraine have had profound global impacts on travel and logistics, disrupted the material supply chain, significantly influenced the cost and progress of construction projects, and further impacted the [...] Read more.
The outbreak of the novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) in 2019 and the 2022 war in Ukraine have had profound global impacts on travel and logistics, disrupted the material supply chain, significantly influenced the cost and progress of construction projects, and further impacted the operational effectiveness of firms. Despite some existing studies providing valuable insights into the impact of COVID-19 on the construction industry, there remain research gaps that need to be addressed. Prior studies have mainly focused on the immediate impact factors of the pandemic, such as supply chain disruptions and workforce shortages, and strategies for effectively reducing or eliminating these risks. However, there is a need for research that delves into the long-term implications of these disruptions. So far, no relevant research has quantified the broader impact of the epidemic. Thus, this study aims to analyze the effects of the pandemic and the war on 136 construction industry professionals, their projects, and firms through literature review, questionnaire surveys, and expert interviews. The study compiles a list of significant risk factors for construction projects between 2019–2022, including their probability of occurrence, impact over time, and overall cost. The study also analyzes and discusses the impact of these high-risk factors as of 2022. To quantify the impact, cost, and level of exposure to these risks suffered by actual construction projects over this period, the Monte Carlo simulation method is introduced. This approach provides contractors with early prediction of risks and appropriate responses to mitigate risks. Full article
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21 pages, 3347 KiB  
Article
Fiberglass as a Novel Building Material: A Life Cycle Assessment of a Pilot House
by Stavroula Bjånesøy, Jukka Heinonen, Ólafur Ögmundarson, Áróra Árnadóttir and Björn Marteinsson
Architecture 2022, 2(4), 690-710; https://doi.org/10.3390/architecture2040037 - 1 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3624
Abstract
Alternative building materials have the potential to reduce environmental pressure from buildings, though the use of these materials should be guided by an understanding of the embodied environmental impacts. Extensive research on embodied greenhouse gas emissions from buildings has been conducted, but other [...] Read more.
Alternative building materials have the potential to reduce environmental pressure from buildings, though the use of these materials should be guided by an understanding of the embodied environmental impacts. Extensive research on embodied greenhouse gas emissions from buildings has been conducted, but other impacts are less frequently reported. Furthermore, uncertainty is rarely reported in building LCA studies. This paper provides a piece for filling those gaps by comprehensively reporting the embodied environmental impacts of a fiberglass house within the LCA framework, modeled in the OpenLCA software using the Ecoinvent 3.7.1 inventory database. The ReCiPe 2016 impact assessment method is used to report a wide range of environmental impacts. The global warming potential is calculated to be 311 kgCO2 eq/m2. Additionally, a hotspot analysis is included to identify areas that should be the focus for improvement, as well as an uncertainty analysis based on Monte Carlo. The embodied emissions are given context by a scenario analysis over a 50-year use phase in three different grid conditions and with two different energy efficiency levels. Based on the results of this study, it is determined that fiberglass does not provide a viable alternative to conventional building materials if the purpose is to reduce embodied emissions from buildings. Full article
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11 pages, 265 KiB  
Article
A Sustainable Opportunity to Re-Inhabit Traditional Buildings in Italy: Energy Efficiency Actions End Fiscal Incentives
by Valentina Cinieri and Andrea Garzulino
Architecture 2022, 2(4), 660-670; https://doi.org/10.3390/architecture2040035 - 24 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2878
Abstract
In recent decades, the Italian building trade has recorded an increasing interest in the renovation and improvement of both listed and unlisted existing buildings by the Ministry of Culture, growing the debate on adapting historical buildings to current sustainability needs. The Italian National [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the Italian building trade has recorded an increasing interest in the renovation and improvement of both listed and unlisted existing buildings by the Ministry of Culture, growing the debate on adapting historical buildings to current sustainability needs. The Italian National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) observed the increase in family commuting and the attractiveness of marginal territories. Despite the scarcity of services, one-fifth of Italian small municipalities are attractive according to some indicators, primarily the demographic growth in the last three years. The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to the re-evaluation of inland areas. Remote working and the new need for open spaces could increase the return to small villages and be further boosted by the fiscal incentives. This paper considers the evolution of last year’s real estate market, evaluating whether the regulatory tools for energy retrofit and tax relief meet the trade crisis with a possible benefit of preserving historical buildings. This research cannot ignore the European background; therefore, this paper offers an overview of EU regulatory strategies for energy efficiency recently issued to increase sustainability, focusing on tax credits for improving existing buildings. In conclusion, some considerations are proposed for future in-depth research. Full article
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