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Humans, Volume 1, Issue 1 (September 2021) – 4 articles

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12 pages, 1421 KiB  
Article
Small WORLD: Ancient Egyptian Architectural Replicas from the Tomb of Meketre
by Arlette David
Humans 2021, 1(1), 18-28; https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010004 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4435
Abstract
The paper presents a study of the context, functions, and rationale behind architectural replicas sealed off in ancient Egyptian tombs, the finest exemplars of which having been excavated in the Theban tomb of Meketre (ca. 2000 B.C.). The analysis is preceded by clarifications [...] Read more.
The paper presents a study of the context, functions, and rationale behind architectural replicas sealed off in ancient Egyptian tombs, the finest exemplars of which having been excavated in the Theban tomb of Meketre (ca. 2000 B.C.). The analysis is preceded by clarifications regarding the terminology used, the point of view from which they have to be considered, and the developments that led to their presence in the funerary assemblage. It is suggested that in the sealed ‘replicas chamber’ or burial chamber in which they were deposited, it was mainly the winged ba, a connective agent between the worlds of life, death, and eternity, that was meant to enter the imaginary realm of the replicas and feed the deceased in order to revivify him. Full article
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8 pages, 212 KiB  
Communication
The Austronesian Advantage: Natural Selection and Linguistic Diversity
by Michael St. Clair
Humans 2021, 1(1), 11-17; https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010003 - 15 Sep 2021
Viewed by 3655
Abstract
The “Austronesian advantage” suggests that Austronesian-speaking populations in Melanesia are resistant to tropical splenomegaly syndrome, a medical condition linked to chronic exposure to malaria. This hypothesis was proposed by Kevin M. Kelly in his 1988 dissertation, a subsequent 1990 paper, and a 1993 [...] Read more.
The “Austronesian advantage” suggests that Austronesian-speaking populations in Melanesia are resistant to tropical splenomegaly syndrome, a medical condition linked to chronic exposure to malaria. This hypothesis was proposed by Kevin M. Kelly in his 1988 dissertation, a subsequent 1990 paper, and a 1993 paper co-published with Jeffrey Clark. I now update the Austronesian advantage hypothesis with additional linguistic, anthropological, and genetic data. I find that cultural adaptations cannot fully explain the Austronesian expansion. Rather, the Austronesian advantage, a classic example of natural selection, completes the picture by connecting the Austronesian expansion with greater reproductive success. I also strengthen the Austronesian advantage hypothesis with data from Tibet. The correlation between language expansion and natural selection extends well beyond the Austronesian world. Full article
1 pages, 148 KiB  
Editorial
With Lofty Goals and Familiar Perspectives, Humans Begins
by Kevin M. Kelly
Humans 2021, 1(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010002 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 2391
Abstract
The world is confronted by problems that are multi- and interdisciplinary, global, and complex [...] Full article
9 pages, 203 KiB  
Article
Legal yet Illegitimate Governance in Italy
by Italo Pardo
Humans 2021, 1(1), 1-9; https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010001 - 19 May 2021
Viewed by 2626
Abstract
For several decades Naples has exemplified the deficit of legitimacy that now outstandingly mars public life in Italy and across many democracies. Drawing on ethnographic evidence from extended anthropological field research, this article examines the increasing gap between rulers and the ruled, which [...] Read more.
For several decades Naples has exemplified the deficit of legitimacy that now outstandingly mars public life in Italy and across many democracies. Drawing on ethnographic evidence from extended anthropological field research, this article examines the increasing gap between rulers and the ruled, which jeopardizes the authority, therefore legitimacy, of governance. With a focus on this major Italian city, the discussion leads to the conclusion that this gap and its ramifications are a substantial threat to democracy that urgently needs to be understood in depth and comprehensively, eschewing both conceptual superimposition and ideological bias organic to vested interests. Full article
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