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Legal yet Illegitimate Governance in Italy

School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR, UK
Academic Editor: Maximilian C. Forte
Humans 2021, 1(1), 1-9; https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010001
Received: 17 March 2021 / Revised: 1 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 May 2021 / Published: 19 May 2021
For several decades Naples has exemplified the deficit of legitimacy that now outstandingly mars public life in Italy and across many democracies. Drawing on ethnographic evidence from extended anthropological field research, this article examines the increasing gap between rulers and the ruled, which jeopardizes the authority, therefore legitimacy, of governance. With a focus on this major Italian city, the discussion leads to the conclusion that this gap and its ramifications are a substantial threat to democracy that urgently needs to be understood in depth and comprehensively, eschewing both conceptual superimposition and ideological bias organic to vested interests. View Full-Text
Keywords: Naples; Italy; legitimacy; misgovernance; second-class citizens Naples; Italy; legitimacy; misgovernance; second-class citizens
MDPI and ACS Style

Pardo, I. Legal yet Illegitimate Governance in Italy. Humans 2021, 1, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010001

AMA Style

Pardo I. Legal yet Illegitimate Governance in Italy. Humans. 2021; 1(1):1-9. https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pardo, Italo. 2021. "Legal yet Illegitimate Governance in Italy" Humans 1, no. 1: 1-9. https://doi.org/10.3390/humans1010001

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