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Relationship between Cycling Infrastructure and Transportation Cycling in a Small Urban Area

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Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4, Canada
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Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Antonio Comi
Future Transp. 2021, 1(1), 99-112; https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp1010007
Received: 25 April 2021 / Revised: 8 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 9 June 2021
The role of infrastructure in encouraging transportation cycling in smaller cities with a low prevalence of cycling remains unclear. To investigate the relationship between the presence of infrastructure and transportation cycling in a small city (Lethbridge, AB, Canada), we interviewed 246 adults along a recently-constructed bicycle boulevard and two comparison streets with no recent changes in cycling infrastructure. One comparison street had a separate multi-use path and the other had no cycling infrastructure. Questions addressed time spent cycling in the past week and 2 years prior and potential socio-demographic and psychosocial correlates of cycling, including safety concerns. Finally, we asked participants what could be done to make cycling safer and more attractive. We examined predictors of cycling using gender-stratified generalized linear models. Women interviewed along the street with a separate path reported cycling more than women on the other streets. A more favorable attitude towards cycling and greater habit strength were associated with more cycling in both men and women. Qualitative data revealed generally positive views about the bicycle boulevard, a need for education about sharing the road and for better cycling infrastructure in general. Our results suggest that, even in smaller cities, cycling infrastructure may encourage cycling, especially among women. View Full-Text
Keywords: bicycling; infrastructure; gender; road safety; attitudes; habits; mixed-methods research bicycling; infrastructure; gender; road safety; attitudes; habits; mixed-methods research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Larouche, R.; Patel, N.; Copeland, J.L. Relationship between Cycling Infrastructure and Transportation Cycling in a Small Urban Area. Future Transp. 2021, 1, 99-112. https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp1010007

AMA Style

Larouche R, Patel N, Copeland JL. Relationship between Cycling Infrastructure and Transportation Cycling in a Small Urban Area. Future Transportation. 2021; 1(1):99-112. https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp1010007

Chicago/Turabian Style

Larouche, Richard; Patel, Nimesh; Copeland, Jennifer L. 2021. "Relationship between Cycling Infrastructure and Transportation Cycling in a Small Urban Area" Future Transp. 1, no. 1: 99-112. https://doi.org/10.3390/futuretransp1010007

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