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Article

Smart City Strategies—Technology Push or Culture Pull? A Case Study Exploration of Gimpo and Namyangju, South Korea

1
Department of Public Administration, Inha University, Incheon 22212, Korea
2
School of Public Affairs, Pennsylvania State University Harrisburg, Middletown, PA 17057, USA
3
Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA 02125, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Smart Cities 2021, 4(1), 41-53; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010003
Received: 26 November 2020 / Revised: 17 December 2020 / Accepted: 19 December 2020 / Published: 24 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Data-driven Innovative Solutions)
This study aims to address strategies, models, and the motivation behind smart cities by analyzing two smart city project cases in medium-sized cities, i.e., Gimpo and Namyangju in South Korea. The case of Smartopia Gimpo represents a top-down, infrastructure-focused smart city innovation that invested in building state-of-the-art big data infrastructure for crime prevention, traffic alleviation, environmental preservation, and disaster management. On the other hand, Namyangju 4.0 represents a strategy focused on internal process innovation through extensive employee training and education regarding smart city concepts and emphasizing data-driven (rather than infrastructure-driven) policy decision making. This study explores two smart city strategies and how they resulted in distinctively different outcomes. We found that instilling a culture of innovation through the training of government managers and frontline workers is a critical component in achieving a holistic and sustainable smart city transformation that can survive leadership changes. View Full-Text
Keywords: big data; cultural change; data analytics; IoT; smart cities big data; cultural change; data analytics; IoT; smart cities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Myeong, S.; Kim, Y.; Ahn, M.J. Smart City Strategies—Technology Push or Culture Pull? A Case Study Exploration of Gimpo and Namyangju, South Korea. Smart Cities 2021, 4, 41-53. https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010003

AMA Style

Myeong S, Kim Y, Ahn MJ. Smart City Strategies—Technology Push or Culture Pull? A Case Study Exploration of Gimpo and Namyangju, South Korea. Smart Cities. 2021; 4(1):41-53. https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010003

Chicago/Turabian Style

Myeong, Seunghwan, Younhee Kim, and Michael J. Ahn 2021. "Smart City Strategies—Technology Push or Culture Pull? A Case Study Exploration of Gimpo and Namyangju, South Korea" Smart Cities 4, no. 1: 41-53. https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010003

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