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Are Cry Studies Replicable? An Analysis of Participants, Procedures, and Methods Adopted and Reported in Studies of Infant Cries

1
Psychology Program, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639818, Singapore
2
Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, 38068 Trento, Italy
3
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Acoustics 2019, 1(4), 866-883; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1040052
Received: 7 November 2019 / Revised: 29 November 2019 / Accepted: 3 December 2019 / Published: 4 December 2019
Infant cry is evolutionarily, psychologically, and clinically significant. Over the last half century, several researchers and clinicians have investigated acoustical properties of infant cry for medical purposes. However, this literature suffers a lack of standardization in conducting and reporting cry-based studies. In this work, methodologies and procedures employed to analyze infant cry are reviewed and best practices for reporting studies are provided. First, available literatures on vocal and audio acoustic analysis are examined to identify critical aspects of participant information, data collection, methods, and data analysis. Then, 180 peer-reviewed research articles have been assessed to certify the presence of critical information. Results show a general lack of critical description. Researchers in the field of infant cry need to develop a consensual standard set of criteria to report experimental studies to ensure the validity of their methods and results.
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Keywords: infant cry; acoustic analysis; cry analysis infant cry; acoustic analysis; cry analysis
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Gabrieli, G.; Scapin, G.; Bornstein, M.H.; Esposito, G. Are Cry Studies Replicable? An Analysis of Participants, Procedures, and Methods Adopted and Reported in Studies of Infant Cries. Acoustics 2019, 1, 866-883.

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