Next Article in Journal
Accurate Absorption Energy Calculations in Solution Using the Reference Interaction Site Model Self-Consistent Field Including the Constrained Spatial Electron Density Distribution
Previous Article in Journal
Benchmarking Free Energy Calculations in Liquid Aliphatic Ketone Solvents Using the 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Solvation Theory
Article

Can a Wastewater Treatment Plant Power Itself? Results from a Novel Biokinetic-Thermodynamic Analysis

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401, USA
2
Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: George Kosmadakis
J 2021, 4(4), 614-637; https://doi.org/10.3390/j4040045
Received: 20 September 2021 / Revised: 13 October 2021 / Accepted: 14 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Engineering)
The water–energy nexus (WEN) has become increasingly important due to differences in supply and demand of both commodities. At the center of the WEN is wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), which can consume a significant portion of total electricity usage in many developed countries. In this study, a novel multigeneration energy system has been developed to provide an energetically self-sufficient WWTP. This system consists of four major subsystems: an activated sludge process, an anerobic digester, a gas power (Brayton) cycle, and a steam power (Rankine) cycle. Furthermore, a novel secondary compressor has been attached to the Brayton cycle to power aeration in the activated sludge system in order to increase the efficiency of the overall system. The energy and exergy efficiencies have been investigated by varying several parameters in both WWTP and power cycles. The effect of these parameters (biological oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen level, turbine inlet temperature, compression ratio and preheater temperature) on the self-efficiency has also been investigated. It was found here that up to 109% of the wastewater treatment energy demand can be produced using the proposed system. The turbine inlet temperature of the Brayton cycle has the largest effect on self-sufficiency of the system. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the overall system varied from 35.7% to 46.0% and from 30.6% to 33.55%, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: wastewater treatment; water–energy nexus; cogeneration; bleed air; net zero energy building model; energy; exergy; anaerobic digestion wastewater treatment; water–energy nexus; cogeneration; bleed air; net zero energy building model; energy; exergy; anaerobic digestion
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Erguvan, M.; MacPhee, D.W. Can a Wastewater Treatment Plant Power Itself? Results from a Novel Biokinetic-Thermodynamic Analysis. J 2021, 4, 614-637. https://doi.org/10.3390/j4040045

AMA Style

Erguvan M, MacPhee DW. Can a Wastewater Treatment Plant Power Itself? Results from a Novel Biokinetic-Thermodynamic Analysis. J. 2021; 4(4):614-637. https://doi.org/10.3390/j4040045

Chicago/Turabian Style

Erguvan, Mustafa, and David W. MacPhee 2021. "Can a Wastewater Treatment Plant Power Itself? Results from a Novel Biokinetic-Thermodynamic Analysis" J 4, no. 4: 614-637. https://doi.org/10.3390/j4040045

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop