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Article

Effects of Wildfire and the Presence of the Invasive Paulownia tomentosa on the Regeneration of Native Tree Species in North-Central Appalachia

1
School of Environment and Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Institute of Engineering and Technology, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eva K. Strand
Received: 16 July 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 2 September 2021 / Published: 6 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Wildfire on Biodiversity)
A wildfire occurred in Shawnee State Forest located in southern Ohio that consumed 1215 hectares. Based on earlier forest inventories it was known that paulownia (Paulownia tomentosa), a non-native invasive tree species, occurred in the forest. The objective of this study was to determine if paulownia heavily colonized areas two years after the fire where the burn occurred, and if its presence had a negative impact on the regeneration (<137 cm height) of native species—red and white oaks (Quercus sp.), red maple (Acer rubrum), and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera). Two years after the fire, paulownia had invaded the burned areas but not at significantly higher densities than occurred in the unburned areas. Fire significantly reduced the number of regenerating stems of white oak and red maple two years after the fire, whereas the number of regenerating stems of red oak increased slightly and that of yellow-poplar increased significantly. In areas where paulownia occurred that experienced wildfire, all species studied displayed a reduction in the number of regenerating stems compared to paulownia’s absence in the burn areas. Where paulownia occurred in areas not affected by the wildfire, all the native species studied displayed a reduction in the number of regenerating stems. The average heights of red oak, white oak, and red maple were significantly taller when growing in areas affected by the wildfire due to a more open canopy. However, there was no significant change in the average heights of yellow-poplar. The presence of paulownia in both the burned and unburned areas reduced the number of regenerating stems of the native species studied. View Full-Text
Keywords: Paulownia tomentosa; wildfire; red oak; white oak; red maple; yellow-poplar; invasive species; paulownia Paulownia tomentosa; wildfire; red oak; white oak; red maple; yellow-poplar; invasive species; paulownia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Williams, R.; Wang, H. Effects of Wildfire and the Presence of the Invasive Paulownia tomentosa on the Regeneration of Native Tree Species in North-Central Appalachia. Fire 2021, 4, 60. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030060

AMA Style

Williams R, Wang H. Effects of Wildfire and the Presence of the Invasive Paulownia tomentosa on the Regeneration of Native Tree Species in North-Central Appalachia. Fire. 2021; 4(3):60. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030060

Chicago/Turabian Style

Williams, Roger, and Haibin Wang. 2021. "Effects of Wildfire and the Presence of the Invasive Paulownia tomentosa on the Regeneration of Native Tree Species in North-Central Appalachia" Fire 4, no. 3: 60. https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4030060

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