Next Article in Journal
Sowing the Seeds of a Pandemic? Mammalian Pathogenicity and Transmissibility of H1 Variant Influenza Viruses from the Swine Reservoir
Next Article in Special Issue
Schistosomiasis in the Philippines: Innovative Control Approach is Needed if Elimination is the Goal
Previous Article in Journal
Endemic Melioidosis in Southern China: Past and Present
Previous Article in Special Issue
Elimination of Schistosomiasis Mekongi from Endemic Areas in Cambodia and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: Current Status and Plans
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview

Asian Schistosomiasis: Current Status and Prospects for Control Leading to Elimination

1
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
2
Department of Global Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Acton, ACT 2601, Australia
3
School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
4
Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
5
Telethon Kids Institute, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
6
Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Parasitic Diseases, Shanghai 200025, China
7
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland
8
University of Basel, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Joint first authors.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010040
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prospects for Schistosomiasis Elimination)
  |  
PDF [5256 KB, uploaded 27 February 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Schistosomiasis is an infectious disease caused by helminth parasites of the genus Schistosoma. Worldwide, an estimated 250 million people are infected with these parasites with the majority of cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. Within Asia, three species of Schistosoma cause disease. Schistosoma japonicum is the most prevalent, followed by S. mekongi and S. malayensis. All three species are zoonotic, which causes concern for their control, as successful elimination not only requires management of the human definitive host, but also the animal reservoir hosts. With regard to Asian schistosomiasis, most of the published research has focused on S. japonicum with comparatively little attention paid to S. mekongi and even less focus on S. malayensis. In this review, we examine the three Asian schistosomes and their current status in their endemic countries: Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, and Thailand (S. mekongi); Malaysia (S. malayensis); and Indonesia, People’s Republic of China, and the Philippines (S. japonicum). Prospects for control that could potentially lead to elimination are highlighted as these can inform researchers and disease control managers in other schistosomiasis-endemic areas, particularly in Africa and the Americas. View Full-Text
Keywords: Asia; control; elimination; epidemiology; Schistosoma japonicum; Schistosoma malayensis; Schistosoma mekongi; schistosomiasis Asia; control; elimination; epidemiology; Schistosoma japonicum; Schistosoma malayensis; Schistosoma mekongi; schistosomiasis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gordon, C.A.; Kurscheid, J.; Williams, G.M.; Clements, A.C.A.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.-N.; Utzinger, J.; McManus, D.P.; Gray, D.J. Asian Schistosomiasis: Current Status and Prospects for Control Leading to Elimination. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4, 40.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. EISSN 2414-6366 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top